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Evacuees ideas?

Discussion in 'Drama and performing arts' started by iheartpoetry, Mar 15, 2012.

  1. Hi all,
    I'm a PGCE student and have a high ability year 8 class.
    Have scoured the internet for resources but struggling to find inspiration for a great scheme on the evacuees in WW2.
    I've been given complete freedom in terms of how to approach it. I'm exploring it chronologically and we have got as far recreating the train station and saying goodbye. I would like to focus on the train journey next.
    Any ideas at all would be hugely appreciated.
    Many thanks.

     
  2. So - to clarify - you've taken over a scheme but the rest of the scheme is missing, or you are teaching a scheme but planning lesson by lesson?
    Neither sounds satisfactory.
    What's your purpose? What are the children learning - history or Drama?
    There's a holocaust scheme here - put suitcase into search box.


     
  3. I have been given a scheme which consists of a few bullet points for each lesson. Therefore I am pretty much planning lesson by lesson on my own.
    I am a Drama teacher but I want students to empathise with the plight of evacuee children. That's my main purpose.
    My main issue is with the techniques to include in each lesson, rather than the content of the lesson. I am recreating the train journey tomorrow and have already done lots of freeze frames and thought-tracking, plus they are very bright so I want to challenge them.

     
  4. Thanks for the resource link - alas, I am an impoverished student teacher and cannot afford to spend any money on resources.
     
  5. You haven't been given a scheme then.
    You are doomed to failure - as is any teacher who tries this approach. OFSTED would slaughter you. Can't see your first post as I type, but if you are a PGCE students, as I recall, so will your tutor.
    It is impossible to guide you without knowing the kids, what they have done - with you and prior to you - and what is coming next.
    Seriously - if you don't really know what you are going to do tomorrow, it's appalling planning.
    You are now going to say that I am being negative. So I'll say - news reel (PATHE), the "foster" families' POV, contrasts between "real" and "foster" parents, hope v. reality, country v. town, siblings, diaries............

    (EDIT: Above was written at same time as you were writing Post 4 and before I saw it. Looks like Google needs to be your friend, then).
     
  6. Found your post rather presumptious.
    I have 7 classes and various uni assignments to factor into my planning time.
    I have spent the last 3 hours scouring the internet for resources but am unsatisfied with what I've found because I'm a caring teacher who wants to provide the most engaging and worthwhile experience for her pupils.
    So how dare you accuse me of being appalling!


     
  7. I agree a little with resources4drama... Your problem begins with wasting 3hrs on the Internet searching for lesson ideas. Your stimulus is evacuees try and be creative and consider how u can attack this stimulus using a variety of strategies such as, hot seating, cross cutting, monologues, forum theatre, whole group drama etc...

    I am positive if you spent 3hrs planning for yourself u would thoroughly enjoy the sow overview much more

    Hope that helps x
     
  8. DaisysLot

    DaisysLot Senior commenter

    On the homefront - world war 2 drama workshops - Search the resource section of this website under my user name.
     
  9. Have you checked with English or History colleagues as to what they may have already studied?
    e.g. Goodnight Mr Tom; the Lion, the Witch & the Wardrobe. Would they be too young to have encountered the Diary of Ann Frank?
    Are you also using this as a vehicle for drama conventions in creating (e.g. hotseating; conscience alley) and presenting (e.g. flashback, narration, tableau...)?
    Sounds a rich vein to mine... enjoy & good luck!
     
  10. Lynz2512,
    I just found it a little hurtful. Surely, teaching colleagues understand how incredibly exhausting this job is and why someone might not wish to be told their practice is appalling. Especially when already a little teary after endless 14 hour days and lack of self-esteem.
    I am planning for myself. I wasn't searching for other people's resources to use - but for inspiration from elsewhere.
    I am also doing this with a mere 5 months of experience so still trying to figure out how this all works.
    Thanks for your suggestions.
     
  11. You are obviously stressed out.
    However - you also say that you want the best for your students.
    Planning lessons on an ad hoc basis the day before you deliver them is not going to do the students any good and - by your own admission - is doing yourself no good either.
    Sooner or later - and I guarantee this, 100% - you will be criticised for this. Whether it is by OFSTED when they walk in next week (they could) or by your UNi. supervisor, or later when you get a job, it will happen (and not planning lessons is a disciplinary offence). I would not let a trainee teacher in my dept. teach without having planned the scheme. There again, it doesn't sound as though you have a supportive HOD if you have been given bullet points and been told to "do as you like". There again (again), it may be that the HOD is testing your planning abilities, and is, in effect, seeing whether you sink or swim.
    As a HOD I would expect to see a scheme outline in advance of the scheme starting and individual lesson plans a week before the lesson takes place.
    You are storing up trouble for yourself by leaving things till the last minute. Teaching is stressful - management / avoidance of stress is a skill that should be taught at Uni.
    I stand by what I said about your planning being appalling. I did not say you were or your practice is. However, I do know that the kids would learn more than they are if you planned the whole scheme this weekend, not just the next lesson.
    You have been given 20 ideas so far on this forum; it took me 3 minutes on Google to find five drama schemes on evacuees. Personally, I wouldn't use any of them - but I would/could adapt some of the activities in each.
    The lack of self-esteem is a different issue from being stressed. I don't know whether that is teaching-related or not, whether it is a new or on-going issue. One way of moving up a rung on the esteem ladder is to know that you are doing a good job.
    And it all comes back to planning.
    I doubt very much that you have to think of seven different schemes for your seven groups; some will be parallel groups and, hopefully, some work (schemes) have been provided for you.
    I'm at the opposite end of the sausage machine to you; I have got the t-shirt, I have been there. I have seen people in your position (as a HOD, HOF, mentor and whole-school observer).
    So:-
    • work out how many lessons you have left (and check - the last week of term is messy).
    • write down what you have covered (skills);
    • check the departmental handbook / POS which outlines which skills are to be covered in which year;
    • choose three which you can sensibly cover in this scheme (e.g. cross-cutting, flashback, narration);
    • work out how you are going to assess the students at the end of the scheme (what have they learned / how can I tell?);
    • assessment could be, for example, by (each group) producing a 3 minute newsreel about what is happenig to the children who are leaving the cities. Film it. Let the students watch their films and assess themselves and each other. You have the film for evidence for your teaching portfolio.
    But none of this will happen unless you plan it! It is then cyclical that you feel less stressed, your self esteem will (may) improve and you will be less teary.
     

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