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European Countries

Discussion in 'Teaching abroad' started by MathTC, Aug 18, 2019.

  1. MathTC

    MathTC New commenter

    Are there really any European countries where one could teach and make a decent living?
     
  2. MathTC

    MathTC New commenter

    I’m a math/physics/chemistry teacher trained in Canada with 8 years of experience.

    Looking for an adventure. Would bring my family. Don’t have to save a bunch. But don’t want to struggle either.
     
  3. Ne11y

    Ne11y Occasional commenter

    Eastern Europe has a better salary/cost of living ratio on the whole.

    Most Western European countries are expensive, so even a salary which looks promising on paper is unlikely to let you save or do much, especially if you're supporting family.
     
  4. gulfgolf

    gulfgolf Established commenter

    Please search the forum. This has been discussed many times.
     
  5. MathTC

    MathTC New commenter

    Thank you! I didn’t know you could search as I could not find the icon on my phone.
     
  6. the hippo

    the hippo Lead commenter Community helper

    As usual, old gulfers is indeed correct and the issue of teaching in Europe (as opposed to the ME or SE Asia) has been discussed many times.

    As I see it, it really boils down to the matter of accommodation. Lots of schools in Europe might give you a job and then pay you quite a good salary, but if you are going to pay out a large dollop of your salary on the rent each month then you are not going to save much. Some schools in Eastern Europe, like my present school in Sofia, do provide quite a nice apartment, so this smelly old hippo gets to keep most of his (fairly modest) salary.

    As the wrinkled pachyderm has pointed out many times, the cost of living can make a massive difference to your overall "balance of payments". A job that pays a small salary might actually be better than one that pays a big salary, if you have to run a car (or two). Children are also rather expensive. If you have to pay some (or even all) of the school fees for a child or two, then that could make a huge hole in your pocket.
     
  7. gulfgolf

    gulfgolf Established commenter

    And taxes. Don’t get us started on taxes.
     
    yasf likes this.
  8. tb9605

    tb9605 Established commenter

    Before you even get into salaries, there's the issue of work permits. Do you have or can you get an EU passport? Otherwise, schools in the EU would have to demonstrate that there isn't an EU passport holder who is able to do the job before they can apply for a work permit for you. Most won't bother (because, with all due respect, there usually is an EU passport holder who can teach your subject). This obviously doesn't apply to the few non-EU states (off the top of my head: Iceland, Norway, Serbia, Switzerland, Belarus, Kosovo, Bosnia, Maecedonia, Albania, Ukraine, Moldova, Turkey).

    Good luck.
     
  9. the hippo

    the hippo Lead commenter Community helper

    Yes, tb9605 has a very valid point. If you do not have an EU passport, then getting a job in the EU would indeed be a headache. And so would be the taxes. Perhaps the OP should be thinking about teaching jobs in Canadian schools in the ME and SE Asia. There are quite a few.
     
  10. MathTC

    MathTC New commenter

    All very good information. Never thought about the EU passport thing.

    I think you’re right and I should focus on Canadian International Schools
     
  11. MathTC

    MathTC New commenter

    Would you say Canadian or American International Schools use recruiters or am I best to apply directly to the institution ?
     
  12. steluta

    steluta New commenter

    There are lots of non-EU teachers in European schools. Many coming directly from their own country, no previous international experience. Use Search Associates but also apply directly to schools. AS Warsaw, AIS Vienna offer tax free salaries..., taxes in Switzerland are no more than 20%, packages in Eastern Europe are very decent look at the CEESA schools. Good luck!
     
    yasf, MathTC and dumbbells66 like this.
  13. MathTC

    MathTC New commenter

    Thank you. Would you say it’s possible to support a family on a salary from one of these schools?
     
  14. steluta

    steluta New commenter

    Yes. Many in Switzerland, plus AIS Budapest, AIS Bucharest, Anglo American Sofia, iS Prague, Nord Anglia schools in Hungary, Slovakia, Poland. I don’t think o listed all of them, but you will be fine in any of the above.
     
    yasf and MathTC like this.
  15. yasf

    yasf Established commenter

    My old school in WE had loads of Canadians working in it. Just apply - they can only say no.

    Personally I'm quite a Canadaphile (is that a word?). The more of you guys around the better :).
     
    TeacherMan2019 and MathTC like this.
  16. tb9605

    tb9605 Established commenter

    Wow! Ok, I stand corrected. I just remember Madrid and Paris both being full of Americans who'd wrongly been told "you'll get a work permit, no problems", had flown over, been unable to get permits and were doing private tutoring on a cash basis to get by. The only ones with jobs in schools had Irish passports or were married to locals.
     
  17. T0nyGT

    T0nyGT Lead commenter

    Be aware that you aren't allowed to name schools here so there's a good chance the whole thread will go
     
    MathTC likes this.
  18. yasf

    yasf Established commenter

    Think it depends on the 'tier' (hate that word) of school. Bigger, wealthier schools can and do pay for the whole expensive visa process.
     
    MathTC likes this.
  19. MathTC

    MathTC New commenter

    I believe you are correct. Well I will keep looking. If I can support a family I am more likely to consider it.
     
  20. swsimp160

    swsimp160 Occasional commenter

    "depends on the tier" always makes me laugh. The vast majority of international schools are in the gutter and as soon as you work there no decent UK private (state sector not worth doing) will touch you.
     

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