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Eton School Uniform

Discussion in 'Independent' started by Richard Knights, Jan 20, 2011.

  1. Eton School Uniform

    At the start of a
    new school year the cost of the school uniform is a worry for many
    families. In the elite public schools uniforms represent an
    ostentatious display of wealth – money no object. There is still an
    insidious competition of blazers, scarves, hats, buttons, coats - all
    the insignia of power and privilege.


    Eton is of the
    course at the pinnacle of this obscene rivalry and one-upmanship. The
    cost of the basic uniform runs to about £1,000, there are also those
    little extras like cricket whites and 'formal change' as its known,
    then there are the boat fees (£295). Eton has its own bespoke
    tailor, Tom Brown, that has supplied clothing for over two hundred
    years.






    <table cellpadding="4" cellspacing="0">



    <tr>
    <td>
    Eton Uniform

    </td>
    <td>
    Cost

    </td>
    <td>
    Total

    </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
    <td>
    2 tail suits

    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;170 each

    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;340.00

    </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
    <td>
    7 white school shirts


    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;12 each

    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;84.00

    </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
    <td>
    7 white school collars


    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;6.50 each

    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;45.50

    </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
    <td>
    6 front and back collars studs


    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;1.50 each

    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;9.00

    </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
    <td>
    1 blue blazer


    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;95.00 each

    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;95.00

    </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
    <td>
    2 pairs smart trousers


    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;45.00 each

    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;90.00

    </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
    <td>
    1 pullover


    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;45.00 each

    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;45.00

    </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
    <td>
    2 smart shirts, collar attached



    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;22.50 each

    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;45.00

    </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
    <td>
    2 white (rugby) football
    shirts, long-sleeved with collar



    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;23.50 each

    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;47.00

    </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
    <td>
    2 navy (rugby) football shirts,
    long-sleeved with collar



    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;23.50 each

    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;47.00

    </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
    <td>
    2 navy football shorts


    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;8.00 each

    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;16.00

    </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
    <td>
    1 Eton College track suit


    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;60.00 each

    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;60.00

    </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
    <td>
    2 white polo-style shirts


    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;18.00 each

    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;36.00

    </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
    <td>
    Total

    </td>
    <td>




    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;959.50

    </td>
    </tr>
    </table>




    Uniforms were
    introduced into Rugby School by Thomas Arnold in the 1830s in order
    to inculcate discipline and obedience and to tame the dissolute sons
    of the gentry and landed aristocracy. Uniforms became symbolic
    trappings of fealty and dominance that projected the image of the
    institution. At the end of the nineteenth century each house had its
    own particular colours and badges, each sport could award blazers and
    caps.


    Most schools in
    Europe don't have school uniforms, it is regarded as a rejection of
    militarism and conformity. In England schools spend inordinate
    amounts of time enforcing petty rules about uniforms. It's another
    example of how the public school ethos has infected the state system,
    schools seem to believe that sweaty blazers, a heraldic crest and
    school tie is a sign of a 'good school'.


    Eton and the
    exclusive public schools with their cripplingly expensive uniforms is
    a way of enforcing the social hierarchy and keeping the riff-raff
    out. For everyone else there is of course Tesco with the complete
    school uniform at &pound;3.75. Just don't turn up to Eton with it.

     
  2. Eton School Uniform

    At the start of a
    new school year the cost of the school uniform is a worry for many
    families. In the elite public schools uniforms represent an
    ostentatious display of wealth &ndash; money no object. There is still an
    insidious competition of blazers, scarves, hats, buttons, coats - all
    the insignia of power and privilege.


    Eton is of the
    course at the pinnacle of this obscene rivalry and one-upmanship. The
    cost of the basic uniform runs to about &pound;1,000, there are also those
    little extras like cricket whites and 'formal change' as its known,
    then there are the boat fees (&pound;295). Eton has its own bespoke
    tailor, Tom Brown, that has supplied clothing for over two hundred
    years.






    <table cellpadding="4" cellspacing="0">



    <tr>
    <td>
    Eton Uniform

    </td>
    <td>
    Cost

    </td>
    <td>
    Total

    </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
    <td>
    2 tail suits

    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;170 each

    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;340.00

    </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
    <td>
    7 white school shirts


    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;12 each

    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;84.00

    </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
    <td>
    7 white school collars


    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;6.50 each

    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;45.50

    </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
    <td>
    6 front and back collars studs


    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;1.50 each

    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;9.00

    </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
    <td>
    1 blue blazer


    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;95.00 each

    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;95.00

    </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
    <td>
    2 pairs smart trousers


    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;45.00 each

    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;90.00

    </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
    <td>
    1 pullover


    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;45.00 each

    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;45.00

    </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
    <td>
    2 smart shirts, collar attached



    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;22.50 each

    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;45.00

    </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
    <td>
    2 white (rugby) football
    shirts, long-sleeved with collar



    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;23.50 each

    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;47.00

    </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
    <td>
    2 navy (rugby) football shirts,
    long-sleeved with collar



    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;23.50 each

    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;47.00

    </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
    <td>
    2 navy football shorts


    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;8.00 each

    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;16.00

    </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
    <td>
    1 Eton College track suit


    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;60.00 each

    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;60.00

    </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
    <td>
    2 white polo-style shirts


    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;18.00 each

    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;36.00

    </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
    <td>
    Total

    </td>
    <td>




    </td>
    <td>
    &pound;959.50

    </td>
    </tr>
    </table>




    Uniforms were
    introduced into Rugby School by Thomas Arnold in the 1830s in order
    to inculcate discipline and obedience and to tame the dissolute sons
    of the gentry and landed aristocracy. Uniforms became symbolic
    trappings of fealty and dominance that projected the image of the
    institution. At the end of the nineteenth century each house had its
    own particular colours and badges, each sport could award blazers and
    caps.


    Most schools in
    Europe don't have school uniforms, it is regarded as a rejection of
    militarism and conformity. In England schools spend inordinate
    amounts of time enforcing petty rules about uniforms. It's another
    example of how the public school ethos has infected the state system,
    schools seem to believe that sweaty blazers, a heraldic crest and
    school tie is a sign of a 'good school'.


    Eton and the
    exclusive public schools with their cripplingly expensive uniforms is
    a way of enforcing the social hierarchy and keeping the riff-raff
    out. For everyone else there is of course Tesco with the complete
    school uniform at &pound;3.75. Just don't turn up to Eton with it.

     
  3. And?

    Your posts are becoming more and more boring by the day.

    I work at an independent school and the uniform situation here is no different than the state schools I have worked at.

    Not all independent schools are born equal.

    As for allowing the students to wear what they like every day - well, perhaps if you were a teacher yourself, you would have witnessed first hand the general chaos that descends on schools on the occasional mufti day... god forbid we would have that every day.

    Oh... I don't know why I bothered replying. You like to just write your bile but never respond to criticism.
     
  4. Once I went to ASDA and bought some pasta for 66p. The next week, I remembered how much I liked pasta. The nearest shop was M&S, so I bought some there. I was disgusted to discover that it cost &pound;2.99, so I started a rubbish blog and spent most of my time copying and pasting my own semi-coherent blatherings between that and the PES (Pasta Educational Supplement) forum. In my spare time, I like chewing my fingers down to the bone then touching myself with the bloody stumps. After that, I can't type for a while, but at least it gives my spirochaete-addled brain time to recover so that I can write some more stuff that nobody cares about.
     
  5. Curiously, in our school the PTA have a thriving second hand uniform business, raising several &pound;1000 a year on a commision basis.
    In my previous state school, the students wouldn't be caught dead in 'someone else's cast offs'.
     
  6. PaulDG

    PaulDG Occasional commenter

    I'd understood that Eton quite famously did not establish its uniform - the uniform was set by the boys themselves in the late 1800s or something.
    In other words, exactly what happens at most non-uniform schools; peer pressure means the non "uniform" is set by fashion.
     
  7. florian gassmann

    florian gassmann Star commenter

    Yes, my school did that too. And as parents we only ever bought second-hand uniform for the eldest of our three sons - when he outgrew it, it went down to son number 2. Son number 3 still complains that everything he wore was fourth hand, but he admires our thrift!
    Which can often mean buying a total new set of clothes every few months once the growth spurts get going. Total madness!
     
  8. netmum

    netmum New commenter

    Have you seen the price/ridiculous amount of things needed in the average state secondary school uniform these days?
    My children are kitted out from the school swop shop too. There is no stigma in it, unlike at friend's children's state schools.
    My secondary school had no uniform, it was a nightmare for unfashionable me who didn't have the 'in' brands.
     
  9. Leapyearbaby64

    Leapyearbaby64 New commenter

    I particularly noted that the rugby shirts at Eton are cheaper than the ones at my son's bog standard comp!
     
  10. DaisysLot

    DaisysLot Senior commenter

    Thank you Richard - I found that quite an interesting read
     
  11. You do mean interesting in a mildy ridiculous way, right?
    NEWS JUST IN: some people have loads of money.
     

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