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Equivalent fractions!!! argh

Discussion in 'Primary' started by uppereastside, Nov 16, 2010.

  1. uppereastside

    uppereastside New commenter

    I need to teach equivalent fractions soon to a year 3/4 class who struggle with the concept. Has anyone taught this successfully and how? Just trying to think of maybe a hand on way as I find it hard to explain! Thanks

     
  2. uppereastside

    uppereastside New commenter

    I need to teach equivalent fractions soon to a year 3/4 class who struggle with the concept. Has anyone taught this successfully and how? Just trying to think of maybe a hand on way as I find it hard to explain! Thanks

     
  3. You could do a paper folding activity, ie. fold a piece of paper in half and shade in 1 half, then fold that piece of paper into quarters. Show the students that even though the first was 1/2 and the second was 2/4 the same amount of paper was shaded in which makes them equivalent. You could then get the students to do the same with 1/4 and 2/8, 1/3 and 2/6, 3/4 and 6/8 etc....
    Or you could play some kind of learning game with them about fractions.
     
  4. oldsomeman

    oldsomeman Lead commenter

    year 3 only need to learn 1/2 and 1/4 of a number
    yr 4 to 1/8 ,1/10,//or the next step down on the fraction ladder
    i found that playing matching games help,,eg shapes which are cut up by them,and then marked a Db says.........the hard part is to get them to recognice 1/2 of a number when its i/2 of say 4 or 8/
    i find squares or boxes with these numbers in helps
    you have say 4 boxes with 8 sqaures in each....they rhen colour half and then half of a half etc
    or you can do colour in halves in different ways and combinations ..leading to 1/4 etc.
     
  5. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    Do it with cut up paper plates. It is so easy then to come up with some activities where they get to see for themselves that two quarters are the same as one half, that two eighths is the same as one quarter etc.
    They can do the cutting up, do the sticking down etc and make a display of equivalent fractions.
    They will need some help to ensure that the plates are correctly cut up, particularly with awkward things like fifths ............ but maybe with much more advanced year fours you could use an understanding of angles and protractors to do this one, and it all fits nicely with more advanced pie charts.
    I think the advantage of plates rather than rectangles is that it leaves a memorable shape imprinted in the mind, and the child can use shapes in their visual memory to manipulate fractions. For example it is easy to see in one's head that three-quarters plus one half is one and one - quarter using thoughts of plates or cakes, but not easy at all picturing bars of chocolate.
     

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