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Equivalency testing anyone uses them?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by pixiesmum, Jan 9, 2020.

  1. pixiesmum

    pixiesmum New commenter

    Hi I’m looking to get in to teaching, ideally primary so although I have a degree I don’t have a science GCSE.

    my research led me to a site called equivalency testing dot com - They run courses (distance learning) over 16 weeks (or quicker if you want) and then you take the exam at a centre.... has anyone studied with them and taken the exam? I’d really be interested in anyone’s feedback especially before I commit financially.

    many thanks
     
  2. Wotton

    Wotton Lead commenter

    I think you need to check if the uni you want to do your PGCE at accepts the qualification.
     
    TheOracleAtDelphi likes this.
  3. caterpillartobutterfly

    caterpillartobutterfly Star commenter

    Do you need a science GCSE to be a teacher?
    WOW!

    Can you just use books and so on to brush up on science and then take the exam in a college or some such this summer?
     
  4. pixiesmum

    pixiesmum New commenter

    A Science GCSE is needed to teach in state primary schools in uk. My question is about the website/company called EQUIVALENCY TESTING & whether anyone has any feedback Or knowledge on that. Thanks
     
  5. TheOracleAtDelphi

    TheOracleAtDelphi Occasional commenter

    I can't work out whether you are being sarcastic or not, caterpillartobutterfly?

    Unless it has changed, it used to be that if you were born after a certain school year (1979 rings a bell although I may have made that up) it was compulsory to have a science GCSE (which could be a separate science e.g. biology or dual award/combined - not sure about single) at grade C or above (or equivalent) - I believe that it was phrased this way because it linked to the point when science GCSE became de facto compulsory (although if somebody said it was a common misconception, I wouldn't quibble :)) if you want to teach primary (doesn't apply for secondary).

    Original poster - may I ask what you mean by not having science GCSE? Do you predate it, were you educated in a different education system e.g. abroad where it wasn't compulsory, did you leave school early or do you mean you didn't get a grade C? The reason I ask is that the most appropriate route will probably vary depending on your circumstances. Have a look at some current GCSE papers and see whether you would be able to pass them or not with a bit of independent revision or whether you would be better finding a year long college course (this is what a former colleague did). Alternatively if your circumstances mean that kind of regular commitment is difficult for your personal circumstances you could see whether the OU offer a course which is recognised as equivalent or superior.

    One thing to check re science is the practical side of things (I've slightly lost track in terms of what they are doing with regards coursework/ISAs/controlled assessments etc these days)

    I don't know whether they still do but sometimes universities offer their own equivalence tests too.
     
  6. TheOracleAtDelphi

    TheOracleAtDelphi Occasional commenter

    P.s. I agree with Wotton about checking; my comments about other approaches were just other alternatives
     
  7. Pomza

    Pomza Star commenter

    Yes - your university will accept a qualification from equivalencytesting.com
     
  8. caterpillartobutterfly

    caterpillartobutterfly Star commenter

    No not at all. I thought it was just English and Maths, and whichever others you could cobble together.

    I can't see why, at this point in the year, you need to do anything except sign up with the local adult education centre, do some evening classes and self study and you'll have the qualification ready to start training in September. Sixteen week is around Easter, so you'd not start training until September anyway.


    On their site, they say:
    Going to University? Check our list of which establishments accept our qualification before signing on to a course.
     

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