1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

English spelling costs

Discussion in 'English' started by mashabell, Sep 16, 2011.

  1. It’s been announced that there will be a phonics test for all 6-yr-olds from next summer
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-14930193 to establish how well they can read the sounds of letters.

    It’s another futile attempt to improve reading standards. Its aim is to ensure that all primary schools start the teaching of reading with phonics, but they already do anyway. And phonics provides only the easiest part of learning to read English. It can teach only the main sounds of English letters with regular spellings like ‘a cat sat’ or ‘on spot hop’.

    in ‘on - only, once, other, woman, women, who’ – www.englishspellingproblems.co.uk/html/sight_words

    In languages which don’t tolerate such abuse of the alphabetic principle, children learn to read easily, there is less need for constant monitoring of progress, and much less need for remedial help too.
     
  2. It’s been announced that there will be a phonics test for all 6-yr-olds from next summer
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-14930193 to establish how well they can read the sounds of letters.

    It’s another futile attempt to improve reading standards. Its aim is to ensure that all primary schools start the teaching of reading with phonics, but they already do anyway. And phonics provides only the easiest part of learning to read English. It can teach only the main sounds of English letters with regular spellings like ‘a cat sat’ or ‘on spot hop’.

    in ‘on - only, once, other, woman, women, who’ – www.englishspellingproblems.co.uk/html/sight_words

    In languages which don’t tolerate such abuse of the alphabetic principle, children learn to read easily, there is less need for constant monitoring of progress, and much less need for remedial help too.
     
  3. '' to establish how well they can read the sounds of letters''
    Letters don't have sounds, they represent sounds; a subtle but important difference.
    At Elmhurst Primary
    in Newham, east London, an area of high deprivation. Synthetic phonics
    (Read Write Inc) is the sole method of teaching children to read at the
    school and, as a consequence, they have no 'dyslexics'. The headteacher,
    Shahed Ahmed, says, “More than 90 per cent of our pupils speak English
    as an additional language and we have 20 per cent mobility''. The school
    'has 1,000 pupils and not one of them leaves unable to read' (TES. Lightfoot. 12/08/11)
    St Thomas Aquinas Primary
    is another high achieving school. It uses a linguistic phonics
    programme, Sounds-Write. The school's test results show that at the end
    of three years, of fifty children who started YR and finished Y2, 98%
    had spelling ages in excess of their chronological ages. Of those
    children, 64% had a spelling age of 9.6 or above.
     
  4. And try this one, masha:

    http://rrf.org.uk/pdf/Matched%20Funding%20Article-august%2011a%20_MG_.pdf

     

Share This Page