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English Pre-1914 Poetry

Discussion in 'English' started by Gav_Smith, Jan 29, 2011.

  1. Hi All,
    I've just started teaching pre-1914 poetry looking at parent and child relationships to a low ability year 10 class and I'm really struggling. I find it really tough trying to get them to understand the features in poems and why they are there. I also need some creative an engaging activities to look at the poetic features in harder to undestand poetry. Any ideas would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. Hi All,
    I've just started teaching pre-1914 poetry looking at parent and child relationships to a low ability year 10 class and I'm really struggling. I find it really tough trying to get them to understand the features in poems and why they are there. I also need some creative an engaging activities to look at the poetic features in harder to undestand poetry. Any ideas would be greatly appreciated.
     
  3. GloriaSunshine

    GloriaSunshine New commenter

    I've only done a couple of the AQA poems with more able kids and have only looked at the ideas and stories in the poems. I do throw in some terminology and we have discussed effects but I'm not expecting them to be able to put it all together for a while. Is this for a CA? We're using poetry for the exam so we are doing them all, but just a couple at a time. When we've done a few, I'll look at devices and effects.
    Have you thought about looking at song lyrics and videos? You could then get them to make their own - loads on youtube for the legacy spec. Posters are good too.
     
  4. Yeah we're doing it for the CA. It just seems that the kids just aren't making links between the poetic devices and themes in the poem and I find it so difficult to get them to make links. I'll have a look at getting them to look at different song lyrics. Thanks.
     
  5. GloriaSunshine

    GloriaSunshine New commenter

    What grades are you looking at? We did the Shakeseare for CA and, from memory, they don't have to do much comparison. If they're Grade C and below, it's just linking, isn't it?
    Similarly, they only need two or three language features in each poem to write about. Which poems are you doing?
     
  6. If they are very weak, rather teach lots of devices such as sibilance and onomatopoeia, just try teaching them a few simple techniques that occur the most, as another poster suggested. A good way to show the effect of rhyme and sentence lengths / enjmabment is by playing the reading of Auden's 'Night Train' poem on Youtube, giving them a copy of the poem, and asking them to divide it into four sections as they hear it being read out loud- where does the mood / pace seem to shift? Even very weak ability pupils should be able to spot this.Then see if you can get them to work out why (the couplets speed up the poem, and internal rhyme speeds it up even more, the enjambment makes it all run on). Then get them to work out what the train is doing movement wise in each of the four sections, and link that to how fast the pace seems. You can then link this to, say, Song of the Old Mother where that list of jobs creates a fast pace to show how hard she works, or 'Anchor.Kite' to show how detached mother and son feel in 'Mother any distance'.If you have a big room, let them walk as you read a poem, and they can change direction (clap if it's a small room) when they reach punctuation - this is good for teaching enjambment and end-stopping. Not sure if these are the kinds of ideas you wanted, but let me know if so and I'll give you some more.
     

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