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English or Citzenship PGCE? + other (dumb) questions!

Discussion in 'Thinking of teaching' started by faaaamily, Jan 22, 2011.

  1. Hi all.
    In a nutshell, I am fairly certain I want to do a secondary PGCE, and am pretty sure I want to go down the Citizenship route, however, it has been suggested to me that the English PGCE would 'make more employable'. Opinions? I have an A at English A level, am a journalist by trade andam passionate about literature, but my degree is in Journalism and politics, I also did half a LLB before changing degree courses, and Citizenship is something I'd LOVE to teach. But WWYD, oh wise ones?Seems like slim pickings out there for Citizenship teachers. is this the case?
    A bit about me: I have been teaching unqualified on and off for a few years (in young offenders institutions as a sessional employability skills tutor, and in an FE college as a media studies visiting lecturer). Long boring career story, but was a journalist and radio producer in my 20s, and then moved into working with young people on social inclusion programmes. Did the PG Dip Careers Guidance / QCG, and have done odds and sods of work as a careers advisor in secondary schools, but am now (finally!) taking the plunge and going to do my PGCE, probably starting in Sept 2012, after years of thinking about it.
    Other questions: I don't have my maths GCSE - yawn! bet you haven't heard that one before :) ! Whats the quickest way to get it? Local colleges all seem to be offering one year programmes. No way! Are the distance learning options any crack?
    All advice, opinions, benefit of years of wisdom etc etc gratefully received. p.s. it is late, I havehad wine, please do not base my suitability for teaching English absed on lazy, drunken grammar/typing etc. I thank you.


     
  2. Hi all.
    In a nutshell, I am fairly certain I want to do a secondary PGCE, and am pretty sure I want to go down the Citizenship route, however, it has been suggested to me that the English PGCE would 'make more employable'. Opinions? I have an A at English A level, am a journalist by trade andam passionate about literature, but my degree is in Journalism and politics, I also did half a LLB before changing degree courses, and Citizenship is something I'd LOVE to teach. But WWYD, oh wise ones?Seems like slim pickings out there for Citizenship teachers. is this the case?
    A bit about me: I have been teaching unqualified on and off for a few years (in young offenders institutions as a sessional employability skills tutor, and in an FE college as a media studies visiting lecturer). Long boring career story, but was a journalist and radio producer in my 20s, and then moved into working with young people on social inclusion programmes. Did the PG Dip Careers Guidance / QCG, and have done odds and sods of work as a careers advisor in secondary schools, but am now (finally!) taking the plunge and going to do my PGCE, probably starting in Sept 2012, after years of thinking about it.
    Other questions: I don't have my maths GCSE - yawn! bet you haven't heard that one before :) ! Whats the quickest way to get it? Local colleges all seem to be offering one year programmes. No way! Are the distance learning options any crack?
    All advice, opinions, benefit of years of wisdom etc etc gratefully received. p.s. it is late, I havehad wine, please do not base my suitability for teaching English absed on lazy, drunken grammar/typing etc. I thank you.


     
  3. chicabonita

    chicabonita New commenter

    I've heard that Citizenship is on the list of subjects to be dropped from the NC so I would be very wary about touching it. English is a core subject and will always be in demand.
    Once you are in a school, your QTS means you can actually teach any subject they have a need for. So if your school ran, or wanted to introduce, Government and Politics A levels, for example, you could teach that; equally Media, or Sociology, or indeed Citizenship- any of the social sciences really.
    I know of lots of non-specialists who teach Citizenship, much in the way that tutors always used to teach the lifeskills (or whatever it was called) programme. I'd say that's more common than getting specialists in to do it.
     
  4. I am pleased to hear of your wealth of experience and that you have decided to train as a teacher.
    English and citizenship are both currently part of the curriculum at secondary level so I would suggest that you pursue the subject that most appeals to you personally. You should consider that when applying, your degree studies and experience usually need to be relevant to the subject that you wish to teach. For guidance, it may be worth contacting PGCE course providers. You can find contact details via the GTTR website www.gttr.ac.uk.

    Course providers are responsible for assessing your maths knowledge. If you do not have a maths GCSE at grade C or above or an equivalent qualification, again you can discuss this with course providers. They may be able to determine that you have the required knowledge of these subjects from your academic qualifications or work experience. Some course providers may allow you to take a GCSE equivalence test to ensure that you have the relevant level of knowledge for entry to their courses.
    Alternatively you can study for a maths GCSE with a local college or via distance learning.
    I hope this helps and I wish you the best of luck.
    Graham Holley
     

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