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Engineering CAD

Discussion in 'Design and technology' started by annie85blue, May 6, 2012.

  1. annie85blue

    annie85blue New commenter

    Hi,

    I am teaching AQA Engineering single award for the first time this year. I am going to do the design task based around a low voltage light. The problem is I haven't used Pro desktop since university and know how difficult it is. I also don't want the fact that pro desktop is a difficult programme to use to stifle the pupils creativity during the design process as they may then not be able to create it on Pro desktop. Is it possible and acceptable to use 2D design or another piece of software?

     
  2. annie85blue

    annie85blue New commenter

    Hi,

    I am teaching AQA Engineering single award for the first time this year. I am going to do the design task based around a low voltage light. The problem is I haven't used Pro desktop since university and know how difficult it is. I also don't want the fact that pro desktop is a difficult programme to use to stifle the pupils creativity during the design process as they may then not be able to create it on Pro desktop. Is it possible and acceptable to use 2D design or another piece of software?

     
  3. Spencer_DT

    Spencer_DT Occasional commenter

    Would it not be possible/acceptable to use hand drawn sketches and foam/paper models for the initial idea and development stage and then use Pro desktop to produce the technical drawing and final rendering? Also, have you tried/used Google Sketch, the students literally teach themselves how to use it, very intuitive. Check with your exam board on their expectation. We do AQA RM and all of our ideas are sketched then scanned into the e-portfolio. Students can then use foam, card or paper for development models and Google Sketch if confident.

    Cheers
    Spencer
     
  4. nw5298

    nw5298 New commenter

    another piece of software I have come accross recently is space claim. This is a half way house between google sktechup and solidworks. A much more intuitiative interface than solidworks or pro-engineer but much more complexity and hidden depths than sketchup (such as the ability to automatically generate dimensioned orthographic drawings from a 3d sketch)

    Thanks

    Neil
     
  5. Sketchup Pro comes with Layout and is easy to use....(paper based 2 D)
     
  6. timbdesign

    timbdesign New commenter

    If you are preparing students for careers in engineering focus your search on software that is used by engineering companies. Parametric modelling has been the mainstream tool for decades and remains the tool of choice in the majority of engineering and product design companies.

    Do a job search to see how many openings there are for the software you are considering and avoid software that is not used commercially.

    PTC Creo is the latest incarnation of Pro|ENGINEER (include both names in your search) and much easier to use with all new Windows 7 style menus and streamlined workflow. It is FREE to schools. www.ptcschools.com

    A student at an engineering academy recently secured a job in industry based predominantly on the PTC Creo modelling he had done at the school.
     
  7. Space Claim is good but any CAD is hard to get into. I would also consider SolidWorks and choose the one you can make quickest progress with because the kids will keep asking you for help. I have bought Spaceclaim for the school but find myself reverting to Pro/desktop because I am used to it.
     
  8. Hi,

    For Engineering, best to use Parametric modelling software which creates 3-D models as pointed out below. However, if Budgets don't stretch this far or to demonstrate capabilities to unconvinced HOD's, or something quick and free, Pro Desktop is perfectly adequate. It is also possible to output files to 2D Techsoft software and then cut via laser or router, as normal, provided they are flat shapes cut in 2mm or 3mm material. To do this you would set pupils the design objective to create something using flat sheets and then creating a set of interlocking parts. The advantage of this is that you then have to assemble in Pro Desktop and consider how the parts fit together. The student then has to solve this problem. I got good results and stretched the ones who found this aspect easy.

    With any CAD design it is important to model first, using card, to encourage the creativity, then when tested, create on the software. CAD is only creative, in my opinion when you can really master it.

    In my opinion, the Pro Desktop is perfectly adequate and I found it easier to pick up and use, than Autodesk Inventor which I struggle with both learning and teaching now, as there is too much in it. I'm not sure if its still supported. Shame.
     
  9. timbdesign

    timbdesign New commenter

    Freehand sketching and physical mock-ups are essential stages in developing a new design but, 3D computer modelling occupies an increasingly important role at the core of modern product development.

    3D modelling can significantly shorten the time and cost of getting the product to market. How does it do this? By letting designers measure, test, analyse and simulate without the delays and high costs of of making physical prototypes. These techniques are at the heart of iterative design which gets a specific mention in the new programmes of study for D&T.

    Does the 3D modelling software you are currently using have analysis tools that understand shape, space, volume, mass, inertia, friction, thermal conductivity, structure, resonance, forces, gravity, etc?. If you answer no, perhaps you need to upgrade to one of the modern 3D modelling suits like PTC Creo.
    www.ptcschools.com

    How many teachers have heard of the term 'Product Lifecycle Management' (PLM) used to describe the data management of product development? Shouldn't we be teaching students about this and giving them opportunities to adopt specific roles in teams developing new designs? Only with this knowledge can they make informed decisions about their future education and careers.
     

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