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End of Key Stage Expected Levels.

Discussion in 'Primary' started by decj, Sep 16, 2009.

  1. decj

    decj New commenter

    Could somebody please tell me where to find information on what levels children should be achieving at the end of Key Stage 2. We have been advised that an average Year 6 pupil should achieve level 5C, but this seems a bit ambitious. Are the expected levels documented anywhere online please?
    Thanks very much.
     
  2. decj

    decj New commenter

    Could somebody please tell me where to find information on what levels children should be achieving at the end of Key Stage 2. We have been advised that an average Year 6 pupil should achieve level 5C, but this seems a bit ambitious. Are the expected levels documented anywhere online please?
    Thanks very much.
     
  3. 'Expected' progress = 2 full levels from KS1 to KS2.
    I expect 2 levels + and so a 2c would be targetted for 4b, level 3 to level 5b etc.
    All depends from where they 'start' from.
     
  4. decj

    decj New commenter

    Thanks. I agree Chris and this seems to be the message on various websites I have looked at. According to our SMT though, the expected level for the end of KS2 has been raised to 5C. Can't be right!
    (Well, hope it isn't, anyway!)
     
  5. NicoleK

    NicoleK New commenter

    Definitely isn't right! Expected level for the average child is a level 4. However, they are expected to make 2 levels progress from KS1 as the other poster has said.

    You should only expect a level 5 if they had a 3 or they have made better than expected progress through KS2 and are showing the potential for a 5.
     
  6. decj

    decj New commenter

    Exactly my thoughts. Thank you.
     
  7. tafkam

    tafkam Occasional commenter

  8. decj

    decj New commenter

    Thank you tafkam. More power to my elbow when I confront them!
     
  9. The word "expected" is the problem, not the ambitious target. Switch to "aspiration" and it makes a lot more sense.
    A football team aspires to win every game 10-0. It doesn't mean they often will, but even if they are 4-0 up, they will still be pushing for that extra goal. It wouldn't be a good football manager who berated them for not making it 5-0.
    We "aspire" to make a difference to our children, and that our L2s (average kids) might somehow find it in themselves to become "bright". Some will. Some won't. We aim for it, but the culture seems to be to hit the teachers with a stick when they don't get there.
    Incidentally, I have just been working with some data from our LA, which is pretty close to national averages in all respects. The figures for 2 full levels progress was in the 70-75% range in both Literacy and Maths across KS2, and low 60%s for pupils making progress in Literacy and Maths combined.
    So, almost 40% of children across the country don't make 2 full levels in both English & Maths ... that's 12 or 13 children in every class of 30. If progress nationally is 75% of expected in a given subject, then (a very rough working out) suggests that the average rate of progress of a child in this country is 5 sublevels. Factor in the kids who move from e.g. 2a-4c and who count as achieving after moving only 4 sublevels, then you can bring it down to about 4.5.
    The average child in this country, then, moves somewhere between 4 and 5 sublevels across KS2. We (ambitiously) aspire that they move 7 or 8 (2 sublevels a year).
    One "enlightened" school I worked in had dual systems in place - children had a "prediction" of how they should progress based on national average data. They then, parallel to this, had a "target" - a best-case scenario for the child. It was very clear ... the child is heading towards achieving x, but we are trying our best to make it y.
    It's also worth considering this in terms of OFSTED benchmarks. The top 10-15% of schools in the country ("Outstanding") only need 25% of their pupils to hit the ambitious, high targets and move across 3 full levels (assuming the rest make their 2 levels). So - in the current system - it's a pretty safe bet that practically no one is moving most of their pupils from e.g. 2b-5c as this would be way above the threshold for being outstanding.
    But - back to the initial question - we all want to be "Outstanding" for our pupils, and we don't know which ones will make the accelerated progress ... we shouldn't write any of them off by never even thinking that it might be possible. Footballers aspire to win every game; we need to aspire to make a difference to every child. Just take the "expectation" part with a pinch of salt.
     

  10. I just feel sorry for those children who, despite all the interventions and all the support from school, will never make even average progress. Surely if ofsted expect a percentage of children to make above average progress then they should accept that a percentage won't and will never make average progress! x
     

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