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ELS

Discussion in 'Primary' started by daffodilval, Feb 7, 2011.

  1. Hi, hope someone can advise.
    I am an HLTA and am currently running the ELS program (I know its old, but its been revisited in my school) for 8, y2 children, while most of them are doing really well, I have one child that has no problem with 'sound talking' phonics and spelling phonemes correctly on the big whiteboard, but when it comes to transfering his skills to paper, its totally un readable..an age old probelm, I know, but how do I get him through this?
    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Hi, hope someone can advise.
    I am an HLTA and am currently running the ELS program (I know its old, but its been revisited in my school) for 8, y2 children, while most of them are doing really well, I have one child that has no problem with 'sound talking' phonics and spelling phonemes correctly on the big whiteboard, but when it comes to transfering his skills to paper, its totally un readable..an age old probelm, I know, but how do I get him through this?
    Thanks in advance.
     
  3. Has he had too much whiteboard and interactive teaching and too little paper and pencil writing and spelling?
    I provide teacher-training and I note a real anti-worksheet and anti paper and pencil culture in some schools - especially for the infant years.
    What could be more appropriate for reading and writing, however, than words on the page and writing with an ordinary pencil on paper?
    Does he know his 'phonics' but does not write the letters fluently?
    You need to look at his three core skills of blending, oral segmenting and knowing about spelling alternatives, and handwriting, to see if any of these skills are weaker than you would expect.
    And, although he is an individual and sounds as if he has learning slowness or weaknesses at the moment, could any of this apparent weakness actually reflect the method of the teaching he has been provided with - e.g. whiteboard work at the expense of paper and pencil work?
     
  4. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    I agree. Whiteboard pens are not satisfactory as the main means of handwriting or markmaking because there is no resistance. That resistance is actually part of the pleasure of writing and drawing, as well as building strength.
    From whiteboards to rubbers - I've seen a lot of Yr 1 children who expect to use rubbers to rub out every imperfection in their handwriting books. Somewhere along the line, they need to realise that they can enjoy the evidence of their progress as witnessed in their exercise books.

     
  5. Thanks to both of you, much appreciated.
    One of the problems I find with the ELS is that there is not a lot of pencil/paper work in the early part of the program, its a more kinesthetic approach to writing, eg, matching words to pictures, sound talking phonemes etc, and a LOT of use of whiteboards and pens, this produces very little evidence ( as in levelling work). Although I do take photo's.
    I think its a good idea to slowly wean him off the whiteboard and bring in his Lit book.
    Thanks again
     
  6. I don't suppose anybody has an existing parent information leaflet or letter for ELS do they? It would save me a lot of time and be much appreciated!
     

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