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Electrical Safety Certificate

Discussion in 'Personal' started by minnie me, Aug 11, 2020.

  1. minnie me

    minnie me Star commenter

    Son’s buyer has requested . Was due in April this year . Two bed house . How much would he be looking to pay - ball park figure . We are in Cheshire - if that helps ?
     
  2. primarycat

    primarycat Star commenter

    Regulations change so it depends on the current condition of the wiring etc. It's not so much the certificate itself but if the place needs work to meet current standards then that has to be done to get the certificate.
     
  3. nomad

    nomad Star commenter

    minnie me likes this.
  4. Jamvic

    Jamvic Star commenter

    Friend of mine paid £300 for a Electrical Installation Condition Report (EICR) for her 4 bedroom house last year. So any quotes should be well below this for a 2 bed imo.
     
    minnie me likes this.
  5. minnie me

    minnie me Star commenter

    Thanks . Yes - his house is 10 years old. Quote of £120 .Appreciate the responses.
     
    nomad likes this.
  6. blazer

    blazer Star commenter

    A lot of this is just solicitors justifying their fees. When we sold last year we were chased endlessly for bits of paper for everything. In many instances we just said the paper didn't exist and that was that. We had annual checks for gas appliances and we had the paperwork from when the wiring was upgraded 7 years previously. But they wanted things like a certificate for the conservatory roof and a safety certificate for the underfloor heating in the kitchen. As for the sewer pipe that crossed the garden! They were also adamant that the tarmac front drive should have a certificate (It did, a 10 year guarentee that had expired the year before). In the end we ignored the conservatory roof, paid £75 for an indemnity insurance for the floor and they gave up on the sewer pipe when it became clear that it would be better to let sleeping dogs lie rather than get the water company involved.
     
    Jolly_Roger15 and minnie me like this.
  7. Morninglover

    Morninglover Star commenter


    But saying the paper doesn't exist CAN lead to a request for an indemnity policy to be taken out - it did for us when our buyer had a very pernickety solicitor. Cost us around £200 I seem to remember... (NB Wasn't an electrical certificate).
     
  8. Doitforfree

    Doitforfree Star commenter

    Our neighbours moved last year and were astonished at the things they were asked for. Why has this changed so much in the last few years? It feels as if it's just a way for someone to make money. We were able to help them out with a receipt that showed we had shared the cost of having our joint chimney pots repointed. The buyer's solicitor wanted proof that they hadn't paid for it all, presumably to prove that a precedent hadn't been set of it being their house owner's responsibility. It was completely ridiculous.
     
    minnie me likes this.
  9. Doitforfree

    Doitforfree Star commenter

    And what the solicitor should have been worried about, but no one would ever notice, is that our house, which was the builder's house back in 1892, has more land than it should have, so some of our neighbours' house wall is in our garden. Whose responsibility is that, I'if it needs painting or starts to fall down or whatever! Can of worms, but we'd lived here several years before we even noticed!
     
  10. blazer

    blazer Star commenter

    Everyday we expected a letter about the garage asbestos roof but that seemed to have passed them by.
     
  11. irs1054

    irs1054 Star commenter

    Having an EICR is not a legal requirement. If you have not had any electrical work done then there is no particular requirement to have one and this should be the response to the request.

    Similarly, there is no requirement to have electrical installations upgraded to the latest standard (18th Edition) and this is clearly stipulated in the Government's Statutory Guidance. As long as the installation is not specifically faulty, then it is not a problem.
     
    border_walker and minnie me like this.
  12. minnie me

    minnie me Star commenter

    This should have been THE most straightforward transaction but I guess the reporter justifying his fee AND the solicitors and their ‘ quills’ - don’t get me started !? Our son does not want to jeopardise the process so will comply. Appreciate and agree with your responses
     
    irs1054 likes this.
  13. nervousned

    nervousned Lead commenter

    Adding to this that most houses won't pass the certificate because of changing standards. That doesn't mean the electrics aren't safe.
     
    border_walker and irs1054 like this.
  14. irs1054

    irs1054 Star commenter

    The EICR isn't a pass/fail thing. The Building Regulations (of which domestic electrics is Part P) are not retrospective. Part P does not require that work done complies with the latest standard but for a jobbing electrician it is easier to do so.
     
  15. nervousned

    nervousned Lead commenter

    We had to get some work done to get the certificate, a new circuit board was recommended but an emergency stairway light was accepted as an alternative.
     
  16. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    That's not true, actually.
    I have to have my rental property electrics tested at regular intervals. The house was rewired about 14 years ago when only one RCD was required. The new regs are for two. There have been multiple updates to regulations, several per year sometimes, BUT we have passed the electrical inspections twice now because we met regulations when the work was done and new regulations cannot be applied restrospectively.
    If we ever do substantial electrical work in the future we'd have to meet the regulations applying at that time.
    We pay around £180 in Yorkshire for the testing of a five bedroomed house.
     
  17. nervousned

    nervousned Lead commenter

    It's possible we're talking about different certificates.
     
  18. irs1054

    irs1054 Star commenter

    Not different certificate but different circumstance. Rented dwellings require an EICR by law, owner occupied dwellings do not. That is the difference.

    As far as electrical work is concerned Government Guidance states
    Additions and alterations to existing electrical installations

    1.6 Regulation 4(3) states that when building work is complete, the building should be no more unsatisfactory in terms of complying with the applicable parts of Schedule 1 to the Building Regulations than before the building work was started.
    Therefore, when extending or altering an electrical installation, only the new work must meet current standards. There is no obligation to upgrade the existing installation unless either of the following applies.
    a. The new work adversely affects the safety of the existing installation.
    b. The state of the existing installation is such that the new work cannot be operated safely.
    1.7 Any new work should be carried out in accordance with BS 7671. The existing electrical installation should be checked to ensure that the following conditions are all satisfied.
    a. The rating and condition of existing equipment belonging to both the consumer and to the electricity distributor are suitable for the equipment to carry the additional loads arising from the new work.
    b. Adequate protective measures are used.
    c. The earthing and equipotential bonding arrangements are satisfactory.

    https://assets.publishing.service.g...achment_data/file/441872/BR_PDF_AD_P_2013.pdf
     
  19. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    The ratopnale is that you cannot eect every UK house to be electrically updated every time that the regulations change. They often change more than once per year. I was told that my rewired house probably did not meet the prevailing regulations just a few months later.
     
    irs1054 likes this.
  20. irs1054

    irs1054 Star commenter

    The most significant change for the 18th was the "outlawing" of plastic consumer units, so if you had one of those...........
     

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