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Election Campaign Update

Discussion in 'Scotland - education news' started by kibosh, Apr 29, 2011.

  1. kibosh

    kibosh Star commenter

    http://www.tes.co.uk/article.aspx?storycode=6079691
    Supply teachers feel they have come off badly in the recent negotiations about pay and conditions. What would you say to them?
    "I’m sorry they feel that. Sadly, we’ve needed to make some changes because of the financial situation we’ve been forced into. The total cost of these changes is £45 million out of a total salaries budget of £1.6 billion, so that is a modest sum, but unfortunately it has to touch some part of the profession."
    Michael Russell
     
  2. At least he recognises teaching as a profession - never actually realised that before.
     
  3. Devaluing supply teachers devalues the profession. If we're not paying supply teachers to do the job of a teacher then how long is it before someone suggests we don't need teachers for short term supply at all...
     
  4. catmother

    catmother Star commenter

    Cover supervisors on the horizon?
     
  5. Yes, that may be part of the 'narrative'. Short-term supply teachers become thin on the ground after the summer because of pay cuts, so a day or two's training for classroom assistants, and Robert is married to your mum's brother.
    On the other hand, Scotland now has a long-ish tradition of a graduate profession.
     
  6. Don't you think it all points that way? Those changes which are not purely financial attack and devalue professional development; whether as a probationer, teacher, chartered teacher or experienced supply. When experience, training and professionalism aren't important, teachers aren't important and what goes on in a classroom is reduced to something anyone could do.
     
  7. Excellent analysis. Spot on. And the GTCS will love it too.
     
  8. ryeland

    ryeland New commenter

    Remember it's not just the rate, but the "requirement" to kick us out after 5 days which is the killer. When the cover supervisors come in, then they will always be on a pittance.

    This is a clearance of embarassments who have been hanging around applying for endless jobs since the SNP started making such a mess of recruitment. We are not wanted and need to be dealt with. Ties in with the crepe about jobs for this year's probationers.
     
  9. How DARE the SNP boast that they have lowered class sizes when they refused to commit to keeping Secondary English and Maths capped at 20 and are now presiding over cuts (in part caused by their insistence on freezing council tax) which are seeing staff cut and classes rising to compensate?
     
  10. That's the thing that puzzles me about the SNP. Their election publicity is full of stuff about how they're freezing Council Tax but when asked about cuts they blame all of it on the current tory and previous Labour governments. They can't have it both ways.
     
  11. kibosh

    kibosh Star commenter

    They are not getting my vote on Thursday. First time in a long time too.
     
  12. Totally agree with you here. Endless jobs that those further up the pay scale were never going to get due to being that much more expensive to hire. By my (admittedly very rough) calculations, there are several thousand teachers in this country yet to secure the near-mystical permanent contract. Let's just say there are 5000 - I'm willing to bet it's considerably more. If 5000 workers in any other profession or job were made redundant overnight there would be a national outcry. At the very least it would make the front pages of the national press. Now, while there have technically been no redundancies, in my mind what we have suffered is worse - a redundant worker can move to another job in his/her industry or area of expertise if they wish to continue. Their experience would no doubt stand them in good stead for gaining employment elsewhere within their specialism (and this is coming from someone who worked in the private sector for 10 years and was made redundant twice due to corporate takeovers). Teachers in non-permanent contracts have no such option. Our choice is either to leave the profession entirely or leave the country to teach elsewhere. Oh, and there's the small matter of us not having any redundancy package to fall back on and get us back on our feet. We have been systematically removed from the profession so the politicians can start again with a clean slate. We are the mess that was created because roughly between 2004 and 2009, nobody in power seemed to get the message (or didn't want to) that there were far too many teachers being trained!!

    The politicians know that we'll never be able to kick up a fuss. They know that supply teachers are far too disparate a group to be able to mount any kind of effective protest. There's an election about to happen and we've barely heard a squeak about it. It's a national disgrace that'll never make the front page of the newspapers unfortunately. There are thousands out there who will remember this though, and I for one will be telling all my friends and family who was responsible, I hope my supply colleagues do the same.
     

  13. Totally agree with you here. Endless jobs that those further up the pay scale were never going to get due to being that much more expensive to hire. By my (admittedly very rough) calculations, there are several thousand teachers in this country yet to secure the near-mystical permanent contract. Let's just say there are 5000 - I'm willing to bet it's considerably more. If 5000 workers in any other profession or job were made redundant overnight there would be a national outcry. At the very least it would make the front pages of the national press. Now, while there have technically been no redundancies, in my mind what we have suffered is worse - a redundant worker can move to another job in his/her industry or area of expertise if they wish to continue. Their experience would no doubt stand them in good stead for gaining employment elsewhere within their specialism (and this is coming from someone who worked in the private sector for 10 years and was made redundant twice due to corporate takeovers). Teachers in non-permanent contracts have no such option. Our choice is either to leave the profession entirely or leave the country to teach elsewhere. Oh, and there's the small matter of us not having any redundancy package to fall back on and get us back on our feet. We have been systematically removed from the profession so the politicians can start again with a clean slate. We are the mess that was created because roughly between 2004 and 2009, nobody in power seemed to get the message (or didn't want to) that there were far too many teachers being trained!! The politicians know that we'll never be able to kick up a fuss. They know that supply teachers are far too disparate a group to be able to mount any kind of effective protest. There's an election about to happen and we've barely heard a squeak about it. It's a national disgrace that'll never make the front page of the newspapers unfortunately. There are thousands out there who will remember this though, and I for one will be telling all my friends and family who was responsible, I hope my supply colleagues do the same.
     
  14. Sorry, I re-posted the above with the message I was responding to correctly embedded - I know how to do this now :)
     
  15. kibosh

    kibosh Star commenter

    I totally agree. They must wipe the table clean of all us messy, stat and spin busting new recruits who fell for the massive recruitment campaigns. What idiots we are, eh??
    My calculations from another thread on the Supply forum:
    Point 1 is £25 716 x five sevenths (the new 25hour week) = £18 368
    Then for arguments sake, take into account that you can only work up to a max of 4 days out of 5 every week. (This will be the case as payroll systems, HR etc are not set up to manage the way things are just now, let alone a person being on two different rates of pay <u>and</u> tax during any one month)
    &pound;18 368 x 4/5 = <u>&pound;14 694.</u>
    Now obviously this last figure needs to be adjusted upwards for bank holidays etc. It will be adjusted downwards when you take into account December, May and June exam leave (I'm talking Secondary here) . . . . . . so if you are very lucky you will earn less than a classroom assistant and have none of the sick pay, mat leaves etc etc. Diddly squat infact.
    Classroom assistant posts in Scotland pay &pound;15 640 - &pound;17 356!
     
  16. Fairly sure I got £7500 when I was a classroom assistant, doing a 28 hr week.
     
  17. That's if you're lucky to get any supply work at all - which you probably won't. Redundancy in all but name.
     
  18. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    They get around &pound;8k per annum in my school.
     
  19. kibosh

    kibosh Star commenter

  20. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    Beware of 'pro rata':
    Starting Salary: &pound;14,218 (pro rata)
    &pound;7.39 per hour
    8 Hours per week (Term time only)
    Very few are full time so the hourly rate is a better indication of what they get paid, bearing in mind that they only get paid for the hours they work.
    Mind you, we've just agreed that supply teachers should only get paid for contact hours...
     

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