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Effects of sports coaches on teaching P.E in primary schools

Discussion in 'Physical education' started by mj_thomo, Apr 17, 2011.

  1. Hi
    I was hoping for some help. I am in my final year of my Primary Education degree and currently completing my dissertation. The subject of the dissertation is to study the effect that sports specialists have on the teaching of P.E within the classroom.
    Located at the following URL http://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/517385/Questionnaire-on-PE is a short questionnaire that should take no longer than 5 mintues to complete. If anyone has any time to complete the questionnaire, I would very much appreciate your help.

    If you have any questions around the work that I am undertaking, I will also be happy to answer your questions.

    Thank you for your time.

    Matt

     
  2. Hi
    I was hoping for some help. I am in my final year of my Primary Education degree and currently completing my dissertation. The subject of the dissertation is to study the effect that sports specialists have on the teaching of P.E within the classroom.
    Located at the following URL http://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/517385/Questionnaire-on-PE is a short questionnaire that should take no longer than 5 mintues to complete. If anyone has any time to complete the questionnaire, I would very much appreciate your help.

    If you have any questions around the work that I am undertaking, I will also be happy to answer your questions.

    Thank you for your time.

    Matt

     
  3. greta444

    greta444 New commenter

    We had a sports company covering our PPA for a couple of years. They did games with the children which they enjoyed and some skills in football (their preferred sport I suspect). But there was no assessment being done, no feedback and very little feedback to children while they were working. The other downside is that teachers are not developing their own expertiese in teaching P.E.
    Not a good experience for the school as a whole and now they are gone, the children are getting good quality P.E. taught by qualified teachers.
     
  4. That's interesting. I work in a couple of primaries covering PPA time, and as a former Head of PE break the lessons into skill development as well as games time to put those skills into the game situation. I refuse to get involved in any kind of assessment as I do not see that as my responsibility, the class teacher should be doing that in their PE lessons. I am trying to guard against the school using me to teach their PE, and not fulfilling the NC by saying 'oh, they do PE in PPA so we do not need to do it. I also do not allow our friends OFSTED in either, one day I went into a school and they were being inspected(had not told me), and a chap in a suit sat down at the side of the hall. I went across and introduced myself politely, then asked him who he was and what he was doing. He seemed a bit put out that I did not know who he was but said that he was going to inspect my lesson, at which point I told him politely that he wasn't and asked him to leave. He went straight to the HT who came to see me and asked me what I wanted to do, I told her that I am not here to be inspected, I am self-employed and the only person who I am accountable to is myself - I did not see him again.
     
  5. Hi everyone, I am an HLTA in Norfolk LEA who teaches whole school PE and takes on the PLT role. I have undertaken the Norfolk NPETCS course, (Norfolk PE teaching competence scheme) which allows me to teach PE without someone with QTS present.
    I took a year long training course covering all aspects from planning, assessment, report writing, risk assessment and at least a days practical training on each area of the PE curriculum for KS 1 and 2. I had to meet shed loads of standards, be mentored in school and then pass 2 observations by the Norfolk Senior County PE advisor - one was striking and fielding games and the other gym. I now teach across the age range at my school (84 on roll) to cover all the PPA and assess each unit plus write the end of year reports. I run the football and netball teams and have specific coaching qualifications for these plus I have been lucky enough to be able to take the PLT role for the last 2 years so I get involved with just about everything.

    I believe that someone who loves PE but may only be a TA can bring such a lot to a school's PE. I am only too aware it is not everyone’s thing. In my school the climbing frame never came out for gym until I taught it and now barely any child in school misses PE with no kit. I use the walls of the hall to display photos of good work and have a wordwall up to cover the topic we are all working on. The teachers love to leave on their PPA afternoons knowing the pupils are in good hands and they have no planning and marking to do! My behnaviour managemnt is good as I know all the children well and they are used to me teaching them, not just PE but often primary languages or the odd cover lesson.
    I worry about coaches in schools too. I have seen some excellent ones give one off taster lessons but I feel many couldn't sustain a term worth of quality PE teaching.
    I set all the assessment criteria for my lessons, they have clear learning objectives and I work hard to build skills from KS1 upwards which really begins to show clear progression across the school. Coaches often provide the type of games the children think PE should be all about and it can be, but there is more to it than that. I work really hard in my role, which also include being assistant SENCO, teaching KS1 languages and being a classroom TA so I give as much as I can to make sure the children learn, enjoy and have fun. Teaching PE is great - I have even spent a whole afternoon of my Easter holdiay tidying the school's PE shed!!

     
  6. gogojonny

    gogojonny New commenter

    I used to cover one PE lesson out of 2 a week.
    Was sat down and told I was doing the assessments for all pupils. Being young and enthusiastic I did it. I was then criticised for giving out the levels too low.
    Discovered that the other PE lesson was never happening and the kids were only getting one PE lesson a week.
    My views on PE assessment change weekly but it really should be the class teacher who does it. After all if a pupil in Year 6 is only a Level 2 for PE, then surely this is related to other things that the class teacher has more knowledge about (specific difficulties etc).
     
  7. gogojonny

    gogojonny New commenter

    I agree someone like you is great for a school. But if you leave what will happen? Class teachers seem to be ducking out of responsibility for PE everywhere, and to many it is a subject they don't need to teach.
     
  8. Totally agree, it is something that has happened to my own son, especially when they have been coaching the kids in SAT's, PE was the lesson they missed each week!!
     
  9. stopwatch

    stopwatch Occasional commenter

    I am in UK for Easter. I just walked past my local primary school (small - only about 70 kids). I watched a coach take a football lesson with 7 boys (I know he is a coach from talking to neighbours and there are no male teachers at the school). It was dire.

    His class management was inefficient (ie the way he got the children to take the kit out and set it out - they were about yr 2 or 3 - this took 10 minutes). He then spent most of the time doing dribbling and passing drills finished off with some kind of small game involving kicking footballs at other footballs on cones to try and knock them off.

    The pace of the lesson, the class management, the level of activity from the children (they spent a lot of time listening or moving equipment) was not good.

    Gimme a job!
     
  10. gogojonny

    gogojonny New commenter

    Possible he was from one of these endless football coaching companies.
    They charge around £4 a session. Coaches often only have a Level 1 (if that) in football.
    We need a national rule / law - PE lessons only to be taken by a qualified teacher or qualified HLTA. Extra-curricular clubs to be run by teacher, HLTA or a LEVEL 2 qualified coach.
     
  11. stopwatch

    stopwatch Occasional commenter

    We need to put specialist trained PE teachers into Primary Schools (along with specialists in a range of other subjects).
     
  12. gogojonny

    gogojonny New commenter

    Agreed. In the meantime something needs to be done to stop schools hiring sports coaches to run PE lessons.
     
  13. Odd really that international schools hire specialist PE teachers and the UK doesn't.
    Is it cash or is it really that the UK 'doesn't think PE is important..'? And international schools do.
    Dis.....cuss...
     
  14. stopwatch

    stopwatch Occasional commenter


    I think it may be that historically UK Primary Schools are small/smaller than Secondary. This has meant that there aren't sufficient lessons to produce a full PE timetable for Specialists.
    Many/Most(?) overseas Primaries are bigger and/or are combined with a Secondary School.
    However it wouldn't take a great deal of thought to work out alternatives to enable this in UK, eg 1 PE teacher covering a couple/cluster of schools.
    Shot....Putt.....
     
  15. gogojonny

    gogojonny New commenter

    For some schools yes that would work, but for others there are just too many in one area. As a SSCo I looked after 4 schools, whilst colleagues looked after 16 (they were full time SSCo's though, I was part time).
    There are 3 options:
    Train the teachers to do it. Some are great, some are not
    Fund specialist PE teachers - costly. Probelms are staff between schools - getting held up in one school because of an incident, travel chaos etc.
    Train HLTAs

    As everyone knows I would love to see specialist PE teachers move from secodary to primary, with higher quality coaches working in secondary (I am against coaches teaching PE in primary but not against them working with the children in secondary providing they are at least Level 2). I think at the moment the best we can hope for is a HLTA. The HLTA takes all PE lessons, and liases with other staff to plan and run games sessions.
     
  16. gogojonny

    gogojonny New commenter

    There isn't a League Table for PE. It's not important.
    I think many headteachers have been worn down by the system. They know PE is important, but faced with being booted out by the LEA for poor results they turn a blind eye to teachers who don't do PE and instead do extra maths.
    The cash is there to do something. Look at the school sports partnerships. All that money and only 1 in 5 kids play regular competitive sport. However 5 in 5 kids are more than capable of throwing a bean bag into a hoop. That is the state of school PE today - we have 11 year olds throwing bean bags in hoops and some partnership manager then has the cheek to stand up and say what a success they are and how they are getting kids active. Where is the sport?

     
  17. gogojonny

    gogojonny New commenter

    It ain't fun. Hoop as in a hula hoop on the floor. Kids stood 1m behind hula hoop with three bean bags. Queue of 20 kids behind them waiting their turn. Get one go every 5 minutes if they're lucky.
    Should they make it an Olympic sport then we're set for Gold.
     
  18. stopwatch

    stopwatch Occasional commenter

    GGJ as you know I have followed many of your comments on this and other threads. I don't know if it is me but I find them far too mercurial to reply to.
    I just can't pin down exactly what it is you are saying, plus where you get some of your 'facts' from. How many of them are actual facts and how many merely your own opinion or experience?
    I just get very very confused. Perhaps it's my age.
     
  19. Blimey Gogo, you don't see serious dollop of sacrasm when you see it do you?
    I know what you mean and meant - I just think basketball is tripe (and I have plenty of evidence to support that) - a great game to teach and play, but when it gets to coaching and refs 'fixing close games', not my bag at all.

     
  20. gogojonny

    gogojonny New commenter

    All my comments come from my own experiences.
    The hoop thing was when the sports partnership booked one of the best facilities possible for a sports event. Running track, high jump, long jump - everything there. Do we do some proper athletics - no we set up 20 stations, all variations of throwing a bean bag in a hoop. Invite hundreded of kids down (ticks loads of boxes), put in groups of 20 and let them move around the stations. Keep some silly points system in place and have prizes for all at the end.
    What's wrong with this? Well the private system has kids running races, doing the long jump, proper athletics.
    The 1 in 5 is fact. Competitive sports are dire.
    I know you are abroad - you really need to see primary PE (and secondary) in action. The sports partnerships make it out that everything is OK, but it's not. All this money in the partnership yet they cannot guarantee that everyone of my Year 5s will play a competitive game. Because they only allow 10 from each school - that is 20 upset kids to deal with. It's a farce.
     

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