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Effectively recording guided reading

Discussion in 'Primary' started by lillipad, Aug 11, 2011.

  1. lillipad

    lillipad New commenter

    Hi all,

    Am determined to get to grips with my guided reading this year and make it really effective!

    Although I usually plan guided reading, it's the recording/ evidencing of pupils responses that I struggle with. At the various schools i've been at, they tend to use a blank sheet with "notes/ observations" and then obviously the APP grids to be highlighted afterwards.

    Just wondering if anyone has any good formats for recording pupils responses as evidence that are also quite quick as it can be difficult when you're in a really good discussion with pupils to then say "Hold on while I write this down!" - I'm not anyone to squash them when they're keen to discuss a book!! I don't really feel it's appropriate to put ticks next to pupils names and would rather log actual evidence and responses. if possible.

    So how does everyone manage this?
     
  2. lillipad

    lillipad New commenter

    Hi all,

    Am determined to get to grips with my guided reading this year and make it really effective!

    Although I usually plan guided reading, it's the recording/ evidencing of pupils responses that I struggle with. At the various schools i've been at, they tend to use a blank sheet with "notes/ observations" and then obviously the APP grids to be highlighted afterwards.

    Just wondering if anyone has any good formats for recording pupils responses as evidence that are also quite quick as it can be difficult when you're in a really good discussion with pupils to then say "Hold on while I write this down!" - I'm not anyone to squash them when they're keen to discuss a book!! I don't really feel it's appropriate to put ticks next to pupils names and would rather log actual evidence and responses. if possible.

    So how does everyone manage this?
     
  3. I'm just about to start my second year of teaching and completely agree with you. Felt I spent most of the session scribbling notes rather than teaching. We've got Guided Reading books for children to do independent activities in. Might use these during the actual Guided Read session too. I sometimes get the children to write on whiteboards before we discuss the answers so will get them to write notes in Guided Read book instead. Then I'll have evidence of their responses... Might work for Year 5/6 anyway...
    Well, sounds good in theory so far.... still open to other ideas....
     
  4. Start with the question ... evidence for what? who? how will it be used?
    There is, in my opinion, too much collecting of evidence going on, particularly evidence of what a child 'can' do, whereas the important bit should be what a child is struggling with so that they get the support they need.
    I am assuming that you don't have a school format since you are creating your own. It is therefore, I guess, not about evidencing for OFSTED/moderation, etc. etc. So what is it for? Then work from there to create a system.
     
  5. lillipad

    lillipad New commenter

    Well yes I am going into year 2, so it is for moderation should the need arise. There is no format at this school, but the format at my old school was pretty much a piece of paper which you just scribbled notes on. As I am a new teacher to year 2 at the school, chances of being moderated are increased so want to have evidence should the need arise.
     
  6. ges

    ges

    Once a week I record my session with a guided reading group. I make sure I'm clear about the sort of evidence I'm looking for from each of the children and try to ensure that they're given the opportunity to provide it (or not!)
    That way I can concentrate solely on leading the discussion and not worry about the recording of evidence. I can then transfer evidence from the pupil responses in my own time.
    Each guided reading group has a session like that about once every half term.
    For the rest of the time. I use tick-sheets and scribbled notes.
     
  7. When the children have recorded in their guided reading journal we annotate according to which AF the task given was related to. We have been moderated this year and doing it this way the Moderator was very impressed.
     
  8. lillipad

    lillipad New commenter

    Hi what sort of things do they do in their guided reading journal? Answer questions or tasks? My class are year 2 so it'd have to be quite straight forward... Liking the idea of having a journal though to annotate.
     

  9. I have Y3. I tried to link it to planning of the session. One method I found worked quite well was to give them a task whilst reading, dependent on the AF I wanted to focus on evidence for e.g. looking for effective vocabulary or evidence about the sort of character they are reading about. They recorded it on an ind'al sheet and then afterwards we'd discuss it as normal. I then kept the sheets and filed them with the GR plan for that group so that I had the evidence with the plan and could refer to it when making summative assessments later. Also helped me to see what AFs we had covered and I had focussed on previously and to use for AFL to plan next session. Felt much more focussed than previously - I like the idea of a book but it was useful to be able to create a sheet linked to the text e.g. a myth about frogs had a page with a frog on to write in which they seemed to like. Also it's less daunting than a book for Y3 who haven't done much recording of GR before. White boards are great but then the evidence is lost. Of course you still have to scribble stuff down from the discussion but at least you have something! All our APP / ongoing records for reading are stored in a file with individual and group records so the evidence slotted in nicely to that. It was really useful at the end of the year for writing reports as well. HTH K
     
  10. lillipad

    lillipad New commenter

    They are fab for comprehension activities. Thanks.

    So what about recording discussion? How does everyone do this? Other than scribble quickly?!
     
  11. Spot on.


    I hear this all the time, and up until recently it had been limited to EYFS. They feel they need to photograph everything, write down what children say, do, keep pictures, annotate, etc. "as evidence" or to "cover our backs". I'm in Year 1 and every July I am brought file upon file of notes, pictures, photos, graphs, post its, even notes about families which can often be just recorded gossip. Every year I send this stuff to the shredder, unread, and I am certain that once it has been written 99.9% of it is never looked at again. Which brings us back to littlerussell's point: "evidence for what? who? how will it be used?" This is crazy bureaucracy and it should be being curtailed, not leaked upwards into KS1 and 2.
     

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