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Effective use of textbook

Discussion in 'Mathematics' started by franscaz, Aug 22, 2011.

  1. Hello,

    I'm going to be starting my NQT year in a couple if weeks and wondered if anyone could offer any advice/tips as to how to use maths text books in other ways then just setting an exercise for students to do? I almost never used textbooks on TP2 and am worrying slightly that I'm making life harder for myself by not using this ready-made resource that fits the SoW.
    Any ideas would be massively appreciated!
     
  2. Hello,

    I'm going to be starting my NQT year in a couple if weeks and wondered if anyone could offer any advice/tips as to how to use maths text books in other ways then just setting an exercise for students to do? I almost never used textbooks on TP2 and am worrying slightly that I'm making life harder for myself by not using this ready-made resource that fits the SoW.
    Any ideas would be massively appreciated!
     
  3. DeborahCarol

    DeborahCarol New commenter

    Simply getting pupils to think through the examples in the textbooks before doing the exercises would be progress for many.
    I think it's a pity that textbooks aren't used more, including at primary level. Many children have not had enough practice at learning independently from examples on the page.
     
  4. you could use the book as a reference aid. the students use the information in the book to make a newspaper article or poster to help another person solve the problems
     
  5. googolplex

    googolplex Occasional commenter

    I agree.
    There is nothing wrong, or unusual in your school organising its SoW around a textbook. Presumably lots of schools must do this, otherwise the publishing houses wouldn't keep pushing these all-singing-all-dancing schemes. Whilst we don't do this, I ensure that every class teacher has access to a decent set of textbooks for each class they teach (we use Elmwood Press). From my point of view, a healthy work-life balance includes teaching lessons where kids consolidate, and I don't have to spend hours each evening hunting around for yet another rich resource. Even the anti-textbook brigade do this - they just call them worksheets...
    Save your energy for including as much varied and rich learning as you (healthily) can.
    Creative uses for a pile of textbooks... Door stop... table leg support... hiding behind...
     
  6. PaulDG

    PaulDG Occasional commenter

    Make sure you work through every question in the text book you're likely to set, esp if it's a topic you're not taught before.


    Just when you think it's safe to say "Now do exercise 6", you find that the questions in "exercise 6" drop off a cliff in terms of difficulty or introduce something you've not refreshed recently (like subtracting a negative in the middle of an exercise on fractions or division by a variable to a negative power in an algebra exercise).


    Working through most exercises below A level shouldn't take you more then a few minutes (your rate will be something between 6 and 10 times theirs - though there may be a kid or two in set one who will give you a run for your money) and it will stop a lot of "I don't get this" and prevent them losing heart when they turn to the back of the book and find they've just done everything wrong.


    (Oh, and get them into the habit of checking the back of the book and self marking - actually ticking the work in their books - and asking for help if they can't see where they've gone wrong.)
     
  7. frustum

    frustum Established commenter

    Agree - I think teaching them how to use the answers is very
    important!
    Of course, some textbooks don't have answers in the pupil copy -
    then it's often helpful to provide some - read a few out after a little
    while so they can check what they've done so far, or put some or all of
    them on the board. I saw one series which gave selected answers in the
    back: there was a tick by the question number to indicate if this was
    the case. So they could check question 2, and then when they got
    slightly harder at Q6, they could check that one, and so on. That's a useful compromise when there are pupils who can't resist copying the answers.
     
  8. Thank you all for your advice. I think I'll stick with using the textbook for consolidation then, and like some of you suggested- direct my creative energies elsewhere!
     

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