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Effective learning environment

Discussion in 'Primary' started by Manda4, Nov 4, 2011.

  1. Hi all.

    I hope you don't mind me posting on here. I am at university, in my 1st year and I have to take part in a group presentation, running a seminar in 3 weeks time on an effective learning environment. We have decided as most of our group want to go into primary to look mainly at the learning environment for ages 5-11. If anyone can offer us some advice on this area we would much appreciate it.

    Thank you.
     
  2. Hi all.

    I hope you don't mind me posting on here. I am at university, in my 1st year and I have to take part in a group presentation, running a seminar in 3 weeks time on an effective learning environment. We have decided as most of our group want to go into primary to look mainly at the learning environment for ages 5-11. If anyone can offer us some advice on this area we would much appreciate it.

    Thank you.
     
  3. Hi
    Not really sure what you want advice with.
    to get help on here you really need to ask specific questions. If you do that i am sure there will be plenty of people who are happy to help.
     
  4. We are just hoping people can share with us what they consider an effective learning environment in their classroom and if there is anything which is advised as ineffective so we can cover both for and against.
     
  5. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    An effective learning environment is whatever works for your class and what is effective for one group may not work for another.
     
  6. I think if it supports learning it's effective.
    On the walls:
    examples of children's work,
    insructional/'how to' pieces,
    supporting resources e.g. number lines/sentence starters
    range of subjects covered,
    'working boards' to show processes
    and the like!
    Don't have too much wallpaper (pretty things that don't get used or referred to once they're up).
     
  7. ...and this!
     
  8. In the simplest sense, an effective learning envoronment is one where the child as a whole is considered. Each child can access the materials for learning and feel some ownership of the classroom space. When I am setting up my learning environment at the start of term, I consider the physical impact of sound, lighting, temperature and foot traffic, (i.e. How the furniture is arranged for most efficient access of materials). Once I know my students, I make any necessary changes to the arrangements to suit their needs. (Behavioural and academic) Any displays are not there just to fill space, they have function and relevance for the students in the class. Not to keep the parents/admin happy. At the end of my first year of teaching some years ago, I took down all the children's work and my walls were still covered with lovely parent pitched displays! I made some radical changes to wall displays after that.
    Of course, this post is mainly about the physical learning environment. But there are more complex concepts to consider when thinking about learning environments in the pedagogical sense.
     
  9. Far more important than what's on the walls is what actually happens in the class. is the atmosphere supportive - are chn encouraged to challenge themselves - is it 'ok or safe' to make mistakes and get things wrong? Are the adults in the room appraochable and fair?
    these are 'learning environment' and far more important than whether there are prompts on the walls or not.
     
  10. skills324

    skills324 New commenter

    Working walls are also useful for the environment, someone kind of already mentioned this though. Examples of how to do something eg literacy writing a story, checklists etc.
     

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