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Educational Psychology - what are my chances this year?

Discussion in 'Professional development' started by Ruthie22, Oct 15, 2006.

  1. I applied for the Ed Psych Doctorate last year and didn't even get an interview, so I'm wondering what my chances will be like this time round.
    I know it's a bit cheeky but out of interest would anyone who is thinking of applying this November like to say what further qualifications (apart from Psy degree or equivalent), and what experience they have?

    I'll start:
    Further qualifications -
    PGCE Upper Primary
    NVQ Level 4 in Learning, Development and Support Services for Children, Young People and those who care for them

    Experience -
    3 months supply teaching - Primary
    Nearly a year - Connexions Personal Adviser

    Not much really - how does that compare to anyone else?

     
  2. I applied for the Ed Psych Doctorate last year and didn't even get an interview, so I'm wondering what my chances will be like this time round.
    I know it's a bit cheeky but out of interest would anyone who is thinking of applying this November like to say what further qualifications (apart from Psy degree or equivalent), and what experience they have?

    I'll start:
    Further qualifications -
    PGCE Upper Primary
    NVQ Level 4 in Learning, Development and Support Services for Children, Young People and those who care for them

    Experience -
    3 months supply teaching - Primary
    Nearly a year - Connexions Personal Adviser

    Not much really - how does that compare to anyone else?

     
  3. PGCE primary
    grad dip psychology

    six years teaching experience. pre-diploma in counselling skills.
    Seems they want blood from you!!!
     
  4. Hey Ruthie22...i think you have got a pretty good chance of getting an interview; work as a connexions adviser is one of those mentioned on the list (on the UCL website).

    I am also going to apply (for the first time) this nov:

    I have a psych degree

    an MA in social anthropology

    work as a nursery assistant

    i spent a year doing research (looking at heritability of ADHD) with twins (aged 8-10) at Kings college.

    I am currently working as a teaching assistant in a year 2 class.

    Having read some of the posts on this website from last year, it seems that it is near impossible to even get an interview! good luck!
     
  5. Hi
    Have you thought of studying with the OU? But you do need an MA. I studied for my MA with them and it was great.
    J
     
  6. I have decide not to reapply this year -as i have just got a new job HURRAH ... to be honest i am pleased that i dont have to go in that direction - i believe the whole system is a shambles at the moment - and for me the odds of getting on a course are not worth the heartache!

    I wish you guys all the luck in the world if you apply... develop a thick skin - and try to relax about it :)

    goodluck
     
  7. Hi everyone,
    I too was studying to become an Ed Psych, which initially required you to have QTS and 2 years teaching experience as well as a degree in Psychology. They have now moved the goal posts by stating QTS and teaching are no longer essential (same for a MA), although they are desirable.
    However, you must definitely have a degree that is recognised by the BPS (British Psychological Society) and for those who don't, a conversion degree is necessary to gain BPS accreditation. I would suggest looking at the info available on the BPS website. Good luck to you all (incidently, I am doing my teacher training this year...just in case I need something to fall back onto!)
     
  8. Its me again, thought this might help you:-

    New Training Route from 2006
    From 2006 all post-graduate training programmes in Educational Psychology are 3 year professional doctorates. Upon completion of an accredited doctoral programme candidates will be eligible for chartered status, as a Chartered Educational Psychologist.

    This replaces the old post-graduate route to chartered status, as a Chartered Educational Psychologist which required:

    (a) two years qualified teaching experience;
    (b) a one year accredited masters degree in Educational Psychology; and
    (c) one year of practice supervised by someone eligible for chartered status, as a Chartered Educational Psychologist.

    The British Psychological Society was prepared to accredit the old route for one further transitional year, to run alongside the first year of the doctoral courses in 2006/7. However none of the training institutions applied for accreditation for the masters programmes, for which no financial support would, in any case, have been available. It is therefore no longer possible to undertake the old route and all accredited masters courses in educational psychology will cease at the end of August 2006.

    Hope this helps clafify the confusion for you!
     
  9. Hi I am Ed Psych.

    Here is what my experience was prior to getting on the course (but please do bear in mind that you no longer have to have a teaching qualification, so this may now be irrelevant...):

    Psychology degree (I had a First)

    I then did one year voluntary work (Victim Support, Mind and The Samaritans, summer camp for young people with profound and multiple learning difficulties). I did a counselling skills qualification in that year too.

    PGCE - 5 years teaching experience - 3 in an FE College running Psychology A level (and other Social Science A levels), examined for Psychology AQA board, then 2 years in a school (Asst Head of 6th Form, again running Psychology A level and also teaching some English to lower year groups.

    Asst Ed Psych for one year.

    Got on to course at UCL. I know it's really hard to get a place (when I applied to all the London courses, there were apparently 250+ applying for the 10 funded places).

    I think what made a difference for me was probably the teaching Psychology itself and definitely having been an Asst EP for a year (fantastic experience - if you can, do it - there are a lot more Asst Psychologist posts now - general rather than Ed Psych, which will also be very helpful I would think). Having said that, it wasn't a given that every Asst got a place - one didn't after trying for 3 years!

    The experience mentioned so far on the postings seems ideal - if you've applied and not got a place have you got feedback?

    Also have you all made contact with your local Ed Psych Services? I know we can't have people come on casework with us because of confidentiality issues, but you would certainly be welcome to visit our bases and meet EPs - I'm sure most Local Authorities would offer that, particularly in holiday times.

    It is a good job (although I don't disagree with 'tigsley' that it may feel like things are in a bit of a mess - good luck with your new job btw!). I love going to different schools and meeting different people every day - no 2 days are the same.

    I think most courses (certainly the London ones) will be looking for people who can demonstrate a range of skills, I would think they'll be looking for people perhaps who can use a 'social' model of considering children's needs. What I mean by this, is not using a traditional medical model as your default explanation of a child's needs, i.e. 'labelling' a child and seeing the label as all important. I was clearly trained to consider all angles - what's the teacher's view and why, what's the child's view and why, what's the parental view and why, peers' reactions, community issues - definitely adopting a holistic view (if that helps with any interview questions). Also have a clear evidence base (particularly if you want to go to UCL!) for your work - they love evidence based practice there and clear use of research to demonstrate your thinking, in any interview answers.

    I would assume you'd also get a grilling about all thing ECM related in any forthcoming interviews and possibly be prep'd to answer questions on specific groups (obviously SEN, but also groups with additional needs such as young people in care etc).

    Stick with it if you can as it is worth it - please feel free to ask any other questions if it is helpful to you - I do remember how hard it was to get a place on the course!

    Best of luck - the profession desperately needs new EPs (don't forget that due to the age profile of the profession, in a few years, lots of EPs will be retiring so that will create lots of gaps).
     
  10. Thanks,BBKF! That was excellent info and very useful too! Im going to be applying this year.

    My qualifications/experience (although not much):
    Post grad dip in psychology (conversion)
    Primary teacher
    Have worked voluntarily with inner city school children, raising their standards in education.
     
  11. I would like to add i applied to london last year...
    i got one interview out of 4 applications - there were about 470 applications for 12 funded places at the college i was interviewed at... i even got shortlisted after interview...i was number 22 on the waiting list for 12 places.... so i know my skills an knowledge were enough... but i still thought the odds were too high...

    now i dont know if it has been finalised -but there was talk on hear earlier in the year that funded places were going to be halved... I have also heard of people who get to interview one year and dont the next!

    If they really wanted peopel to train as ep's they would up the numbers on the training courses...but they dont... it makes me wonder what is going on


    anyway to cut along story short - the odds are not 250 applicants you can easily double that since the teaching requirment was removed!... not such great news if you are a teacher!!

     
  12. Hi - sadly tigsley I can tell you what's happening. The government is not pouring any money into lots of public services, and in particular they are choosing not to give funds to the EP funding for training so yes you are right, talk is of slashing the numbers of EPs coming out of training by about half, currently.

    We were told to write to our local MPs about the issue.

    Seems like it could get harder rather than easier for those wanting to become an EP, which is a pity as I think our profession does some useful work, alongside other education colleagues.
     
  13. O_J

    O_J

    Hi,

    A few things people may be interested in: Yes, the government did cut funding but I hear they have now backtracked and there will be funding for 150 places this year.

    However, last year the IoE had roughly 480 applicants, and UCL around 400 too I think (for 12 places!!!)

    In terms of qualifications, I hear that some trainees on the UCL course are qualified teachers and some are not. I asked if any trainees have other post-grad qualifications (e.g MSc) and was told they didn't and that they weren't necessary for the course (although perhaps to put yourself ahead of the competition they might be?!).

    Some trainees this year are 23/24 ish, which I would assume means they haven't got a great deal of other qualifications or tons of work experience. Although, I did hear that many of the applicants last year already had PHDs (whether they got accepted I don't know!). I have heard of one trainee who got accepted whilst still completing her undergrad degree...

    Anyway, hope that helps. I am applying again after not getting in last year (no interview).

    I'd be interested to know what people think about age... better to start training young or do you think one needs a good 5+ years of experience behind them?

    good luck everyone!
    xxx
     
  14. O_J

    O_J

    Sorry, one more thing... I have been reading all the threads relating to Ed Psych training and it seems that working as an Assistant Ed Psych is the golden ticket. However, isn't it going to be extremely hard now to get an AEP job seeing as all trainees must work as AEPs in Year 2 and 3 of the doctorate? They will surely take priority over people not on the training course. Anyone know anything about this?
     
  15. I don't think that there is any 'golden ticket' so to speak. Yes there are some experiences that are going to be more desirable than others, but I think the key is emphasising what you have learnt from a particular role/experience, and how that is applicable to you being a successful trainee.

     
  16. I think that being an AEP is almost a 'golden ticket' I just started the ed.psych doctorate in September and 9 out of 15 of us were AEP's before, so it's worth seeking an AEP post!!
     
  17. "I have decide not to reapply this year -as i have just got a new job HURRAH ... to be honest i am pleased that i dont have to go in that direction - i believe the whole system is a shambles at the moment - and for me the odds of getting on a course are not worth the heartache!"
    This pretty much sums up how I feel!

    I too applied last year and didn't get an interview, even though 2 ed psychs looked over my application form and thought I would definitely get on the course!

    I have a high 2;1 (some papers were a first) in experimental psychology from Oxford, PGCE (Primary), 2 years teaching experience, 2 years working within learning difficulties and autism with young adults and 2 years running a brownie pack, my third year research was conducted in schools assessing children's metacognition.

    I feel like I have done everything they said and they keep moving the goal posts. However, I thank them for introducing me to teaching which I never would have considered before, and is actually somehting I excel at. My school is delighted I am not applying this year and is paying for post-grad qualifications for me, as well as providing as many opportunities for career progression as possible. I was dissappointed initially, I felt by not applying I had let myself down. Now i feel relieved I haven't got to worry about it anymore, and can actually do a job I love.

    My other concerns were when I would have children, how many times would I apply and not succeed before deciding to give up. I want to start a family before the age of 34, which only gives me 7 years from now which meant I would have had to get on this year, or not start a family then, and that was more important to me. I also am not that inspired by the changing role of the EP (particularly in my LA working with only the most severe cases), I am much more interested in the integration of all pupils within a mainstream classroom. On top of this i have met some incredibly inspiring people within education, none of them have been ed psychs.

    In answer to your question though, I am told by people in the know, that it is not so much experience, but how you apply it, and how you get that across on the form. Having said that I know someone with a PHD a no experience of working with children at all who got an interview. She didn't get a place as she couldn't answer the questions as they all related to personal experience, and even if she had surely she doesn't satisfy the entry requirements.
     
  18. I applied the year before last (the last year of the 1 year course) and got an interview at IoE. I think a snappy application did it for me, which was helped by lots of background reading and making lots of psychology/SEN links within my knowledge and experience. I found speaking to students on the course at the open evening very helpful in terms of a couple of very 'current' issues to refer to.

    My experience at that time was 2:1 Psychology degree, PGCE Primary and 2 years of teaching in the same year group. I look back and think I was quite lucky. However, the interviews were another story. Terrified? I nearly wet myself all the way through. I lost my nerve fairly catastrophically and have now had a rethink vis-a-vis a career as an EP due to the restructuring and other career opportunities that have come my way since.

    Good luck to all applying this year, though!
     
  19. Does anyone know where assistant ed psych jobs are advertised? I never seem to come across them!
     

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