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Edexcel GCSE Drama Units 1 and 2 coursework

Discussion in 'Drama and performing arts' started by crunchynut, May 15, 2012.

  1. Hi all!

    After moderating the GCSE coursework this year we've decided we want to restructure how we deliver it this year, particularly including more explicit differentiation as, like many of you, we have kids ranging from A*-G in the same class.
    Are there any kind souls out there who would mind sharing with me the guidance they give their students on how to approach the coursework, just to give me a broader view of how people do it and hopefully give me some ideas?
    Thanks in advance - I'm massively grateful for any/all suggestions! :)
     
  2. Hi all!

    After moderating the GCSE coursework this year we've decided we want to restructure how we deliver it this year, particularly including more explicit differentiation as, like many of you, we have kids ranging from A*-G in the same class.
    Are there any kind souls out there who would mind sharing with me the guidance they give their students on how to approach the coursework, just to give me a broader view of how people do it and hopefully give me some ideas?
    Thanks in advance - I'm massively grateful for any/all suggestions! :)
     
  3. Hi there crunchynut
    I've been thinking along similar lines. For current Y10 and Y9 (first year GCSE students) I've been encouraging them to write a log book entry after each session. I've given them a set of questions to help them structure it so that when they get to the controlled assessment coursework they know what style to write in. As one of my Y9 students said to me this week as they have been preparing for the coursework "it's just like my log book".
    This should get students away from the "we did this, we did that, I liked this, I didn't like that" which I was getting from students in previous years. The questions are simple so that the lower band students can access them but obviously the upper band students can add more depth to their responses:
    1. Which explorative strategies were used?
    2. How were they used and to what effect?
    3. Which medium were used?
    4. How were they used and to what effect?
    5. Which elements were used?
    6. How were they used and to what effect?
    7. Who in your group do you feel worked particularly well in this task and why do you think what you think?
    8. Who in your group do you feel struggled in this task and why do you think what you think?
    9. How well do you think you personally did in this task and why do you think what you think?
    I don't know if those are enough to help you but they might be a good starting point. I'm about to find out in the next few weeks if they're enough for my cohort. Let me know what you think.
    Cheers
    Nicky
     
  4. Thanks Nicky, that's helpful and interesting to know you're going through a similar process.
    I was also thinking about using a more structured log book this year. We sort of made notes as we went along but I don't think they were making notes about quite the right things, if that makes sense? They had a booklet which we did in retrospect in which I summarised the lessons and they did a check list of the strategies, mediums and elements used under each lesson. I think perhaps I could use that as part of the ongoing log book?
    We did a sort of similar thing to you with the use of questions. I'm just wondering whether I could do it in a bit more of a differentiated way? For example, I found that the annotating type ideas were more successful with the lower ability, and they really struggled to write in prose, even with structured questions. However, I found the higher ability were limiting themselves in these sorts of tasks. I'm just wondering whether I could differentiate this further to support the least able and push the most able? I'm worried about structuring too much and I'm not 100% sure how much guidance we can give.
     
  5. Elrae, you have hit the nail on the head!
    For a lot of schools, they only really start to get students to log what they are doing when they reach GCSE, the idea of logging work should start in year 7 so that the stduents are already aux fait with the idea of what they need to and when they need to do it, they shoiuld also be using the language of the GCSE in their KS3 lessons.
    Consider your stduents to be on a five year journey, rather than a three/two year journey.

    Gurd
     
  6. It's alright for those of you who actually have Y7 Drama on their curriculum! In my case it IS a two year journey and I have no option on it :(

     
  7. I have student booklets/log books for each unit. It's almost a writing frame really and students make notes in them. They then take the notes (not continuous prose) into controlled conditions. I am happy to share. Blood Brothers and Mental Health SoW. We have had huge success with them.
     
  8. Absolutely! I totally know where you're coming from with this one! None of our current KS4 have had more than a handful of lessons in Y9, which, I appreciate, is more than you get Nicky! We have managed to secure 18 lessons a year for each year of KS3, which isn't a lot. I'm hoping that'll be better but, up til now, it really has been starting from scratch in Y10. :(
     
  9. Is there any chance you could email them to me please on drama.jsm@gmail.com ? I'd really appreciate a look! Thanks! :)
     
  10. Will send over now.
     
  11. Sent...let me know if they are any help.
     
  12. Got them. Thanks so much, will have a proper look tomorrow and get back to you. :)
     
  13. aoconnor334

    aoconnor334 New commenter

    I would also love to have a look at those SOW to get a different perspective if possible
    Many thanks
    adriane_oconnor@hotmail.co.uk
     
  14. Please could you send me this information as well? Many thanks. U1168987@unimail.hud.ac.uk
     
  15. dande

    dande New commenter

    I would (personally) avoid using questions of this nature as this will led to students evaluating the outcome of the work (product/performance/sharing) rather than the actual exploration. The focus needs to be on how the exploration helped the students to develop their understanding of the stimuli/theme.
    Starting points are always difficult, but I would, when considering the final piece, try to encurage students to write in essay format. These tend to be more effective than ones where the students are quite 'bitty' in their approach and are generally easier to assess.

     
  16. I think the other potential difficulty with those questions is that, particularly for weaker kids, it could lead to quite narrative answers about what they did.It's tricky though and I'm also still refining what we're doing.

    Yeah, I agree about essay format. Next year I'm planning to do properly differentiated resources for them. I've found this year that the weakest (kids who are looking at Es and Fs on written coursework) are much stronger with annotations so I'm going to base theirs more on that, then a 'middle' group' who will do some of that with some essay and a top group who will probably be mostly essay with the odd bit of annotation. It's hard though as the most able practically are not always the most able for written and some of the weak practical kids can produce great coursework.
     
  17. I can see what you're saying but I've found this year with first year GCSE; the students have focused specifically on how individuals in their working GROUP have worked. For example; one student made a reference to someone in their group not understanding the task or not remaining focused which in turn avoided the risk of "so and so did well in their performance...." comments. So, from my groups' perspective this is working.
    I have been encouraging the more able students to much more reflective and whats more - the full mark example on the Edexcel website refers to the work of other groups in a reflective and evaluative manner - stating things along the lines of "on observing another group's work; I noticed the use of proxemics to highlight the tension between the two characters" or something like that rather than "when watching Johnny's group's performance I thought Johnny was committed to his character but Bobby wasn't" which is something I specifically tell them NOT to do. We've been looking at this top band example piece and trying to base their work along those lines and I've been working on a narrative language vs reflective language help sheet too for them to be more aware of the style they are writing in.
    However, no doubt the goalposts will change again by the time these guys get through their course and we'll all be looking at new ways of doing this....... or is that just me being cynical????
     
  18. I'm with you there, Nwyllie! :D
     
  19. dande

    dande New commenter

    It is perfectly acceptable to evaluate the work of others who are either a member of your own group or another group. I would argue that to fully evaluate then the work of other groups would be best as they would have potentially explored the work differently to the student's group and therefore shows another way of exploring.
    How does this show evaluation of the exploration that has taken place? I would encourage students not to put in such comments as this appears negative. It would be better to write about how they worked with others to develop. Students who are negative often produce less successful pieces of written work.
    Sounds good to me! It might be worth noting that the best examples do not cover all the activities completed in the six hours but mention the more important ones - especially important for unit 2 where there is only 1000 words. I would say, for this never cover more than about 3 or 4 activities, even if you did a whole lot more in the 6 hours.
    I'd have to disagree. I think last year there was confusion over what was expected and a lot of centres simply repeated the work that they had completed for the legacy specification. The board should have been clearer in the guidance, but then they always try to allow teachers to find the method that works best for their students. I wish they would simply say - this is what is required and be done with it. I don't imagine the goalposts will change this year, but you may find that what constituted a c grade last year may only be a d this year as centres start to develop a better understanding of what is expected/required.
     
  20. I encourage these sorts of comments as I associate these as examples of "appreciation of the collaborative involvement required" - basically if someone is not pulling their weight in a group - it has a knock on effect to the collaboration of the group as a whole and therefore the student who commented that someone wasn't focusing in their group is saying that he/she knows that there should have been more focus and collaboration within his/her working group therefore they appreciate the collaborative involvement required.
    If I find that a student whom I deem should have got a C grade this year has only got a D grade I will be annoyed - I have one student whom I feel should get a C grade overall - my professional judgement tells me that she should get a C and therefore they are changing the goalposts......I love the flexibility of the Edexcel course which is why I stick with it but I am getting increasingly frustrated with the constant changes (the off text thing they wrote to us about after I'd done my Unit 2 is a perfect example!) part way through the cohort!
    I must admit - I am dreading results day - just when I think I've got my head around it all - I start to doubt my understanding again.......
     

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