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EDEXCEL GCSE composition question - songwriters

Discussion in 'Music' started by Mrs Music, Feb 15, 2012.

  1. Mrs Music

    Mrs Music New commenter

    How do you go about marking a composition that is a song which has been recorded live (vocals and guitar/ vocals, guitar and drums) but only has a 'score' which consists of lyrics and chords?

    Thank you in advance.
     
  2. Mrs Music

    Mrs Music New commenter

    How do you go about marking a composition that is a song which has been recorded live (vocals and guitar/ vocals, guitar and drums) but only has a 'score' which consists of lyrics and chords?

    Thank you in advance.
     
  3. The score or a detailed written description is a requirement for submission, however what normally happens is that they send a complaint back with the marks sheet and give you a slap on the wrist. The marks scheme makes little mention of the score and I don't think you need to mark it, You mark the music as presented in the recording, not the quality of the score or the recording. A score is not a composition, after all. If you as per the marking criteria that is all you can do.

    My only advice would be to tell your student to do a written commentary - how long is that going to take, really?
     
  4. florian gassmann

    florian gassmann Star commenter

    The spec says that "Commentaries must contain similar information to that found in a score" and that it should contain "sufficient information for an acceptable realisation of the composer’s intentions".
    I have never understood how a commentary could get anywhere near such ambitions.
    How would you describe the pitches and rhythms of a melody in such a way that someone reading the commentary would be able to sing what the composer intended?
    The only realistic way would be to use tonic solfa with French time names, but I bet nobody does.
    It's an issue that the exam boards have been fudging for years.
     
  5. spanboy

    spanboy Occasional commenter

    Is the candidate capable of at least 'working-out' the pitches of the song and writing them on manuscript just as coloured-in noteheads or whatever - not great but better than nothing.
    Or could they play the song slowly via a midi keyboard into sibelius (if you have it) or similar, then print it off?
    Or even as single notes in tab if the melody was worked out on guitar?
    Surely any attempt to indicate pitch and/or rhythm is better than nothing?
     
  6. saxo07

    saxo07 New commenter

    I've come across this problem many times. I encourage them to notate strumming patterns (in the case of guitar accompaniment). Most can work out bass lines or guitar riffs on tab paper with some encouragement. I've submitted scores like this in the past and haven't had any complaints (as yet!).
    Another way around this may be to encourage them to record into software that displays the layers graphically (like Cubase for example), then have them annotate the graphic score?
     

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