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Edexcel Drama GCSE Unit 3 performance support worries...

Discussion in 'Drama and performing arts' started by SusiewoosieX, Jan 13, 2012.

  1. Hello all,
    I have an extremely capable and technologically adept lad who wishes to do Sound for unit 3. I know that he has to submit:
    • the final tracks on 'tape' (I assume that CD is ok),
    • an original cue that he has recorded live,
    • at least three other cues,
    • a cue sheet with the timings and levels.
    It is the 5 minute presentation that has me a bit spooked... Has anyone any experience in this area?
    Thanks.
     
  2. Hello all,
    I have an extremely capable and technologically adept lad who wishes to do Sound for unit 3. I know that he has to submit:
    • the final tracks on 'tape' (I assume that CD is ok),
    • an original cue that he has recorded live,
    • at least three other cues,
    • a cue sheet with the timings and levels.
    It is the 5 minute presentation that has me a bit spooked... Has anyone any experience in this area?
    Thanks.
     
  3. Yes.
    What do you want to know?
     
  4. What did you do for the presentation? What kind of areas should we look at? Should I ask the student to keep a log book to refer to, or will a script be enough to link the two together? I don't want tto send him in 'cold' so what kind of questions could I ask him as a mock?
    I'm not sure! How did you play it?
    Any help would be lovely, thanks!
     
  5. I don't do them, I examine them.

    A log book is a good idea. Areas which might be included are identifying the sounds needed, sourcing them, storing them, labelling etc.
    Discussions held with the director of the play about their suitability and changes made.
    The preparation of cue sheets and how the sounds are to be physically played.
    Alternatives that could have happened had different / better equipment been available.
    Why methods were chosen / rejected.
    Backup procedures in case of technical failure.
    "Presentations" could include demonstrations involving equipment.
    The examiner will ask no questions, therefore no "mock questions" are necessary.
    The presentation to the examiner can be done live or can be pre-recorded.
    If a student refers to (say) a log book in the presentation and the examiner looks at it, it is always a good idea to video it (afterwards) page by page and include it on the DVD sent to the examiner with the performances. Same applies to designs, sketches etc.
    The new instructions say:
    The student must complete and have available documentation showing the
    development of ideas and how they have carried them through into
    performance. This must be seen clearly in the recording. Any
    documentation not seen during the presentation must be recorded and
    included with the performance recordings.


     
  6. The above is, of course, only one way of presenting to ensure that the spec. criteria are met, viz:
    justification of design decisions - an explanation of the rationale that led to the design decisions (either in writing or orally)
    documentation - relevant documentation must be available during the presentation
    realisation of design - the visiting examiner must be given the opportunity to inspect the realised design
    communication of the design in performance - communication of the design will be assessed during the performance.
     
  7. Golly, right! I am on it!
    Thanks for all of that!
    Susie
     

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