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Edexcel A2 Aural Analysis

Discussion in 'Music' started by i the t, May 20, 2011.

  1. i the t

    i the t New commenter

    My lot find section A impossible, particularly the dictation.
    In the spec they describe a "simple dictation exercise" and
    whilst I understand the word 'simple' can be applied relatively, surely
    they would've meant simple 'for students' rather than simple for the guy who wrote it.
    At this stage I'm thinking about writing off any further revision on this as
    they can hardly get a point from any of the exercises in the book and I find some of them very tricky myself...


     
  2. i the t

    i the t New commenter

    My lot find section A impossible, particularly the dictation.
    In the spec they describe a "simple dictation exercise" and
    whilst I understand the word 'simple' can be applied relatively, surely
    they would've meant simple 'for students' rather than simple for the guy who wrote it.
    At this stage I'm thinking about writing off any further revision on this as
    they can hardly get a point from any of the exercises in the book and I find some of them very tricky myself...


     
  3. florian gassmann

    florian gassmann Star commenter

    It's something that most students have always found difficult, but the amount of dictation they have to do these days isn't very difficult compared with years ago, when candidates also had to write down both parts of a two-part extract, notate all four parts in a chord progression, and so on. The old Interboard Aural Exam for A-level music was a long and serious challenge.

     
  4. trelassick

    trelassick New commenter

    There was also a time where one of the melodic dictation exercises was atonal.
     
  5. I remember doing that one trelassick - non-diatonal aural tests! I did my A level in 1991 - Cambridge board I think it was (we didn't have an anthology).

    Yes our students really really struggle with this. I find it ok but still tricky, fortunately I don't teach this part of the paper - my husband does but he loves this and is really good at it and can't understand why the kids can't get it - I can! - I was not much cop at it when I did it 20 years ago!
     
  6. non-diatonic even!
     
  7. florian gassmann

    florian gassmann Star commenter

    Ooh yes, I'd forgotten that one. It all had to be done by interval recognition, but they were realistic in the marking, so if you got one interval wrong (and therefore all the pitches thereafter were out), you only lost one mark. Very hard, nevertheless.
    There was also an intonation test, in which students had to identify which notes were sharp or flat. Quite useful, and mostly not very hard, but there was always one very borderline pitch that I could never decide was an error or artistic licence!
    Those were the days!
     
  8. trelassick

    trelassick New commenter

    The intonation test was the one I always used to introduce students to A-level dictation. Very often the wrong notes were so excruciating that it made the whole process laughable.
     

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