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Edexcel 360 Series 5 P2 IAA - HELP!!

Discussion in 'Science' started by emmam25, Nov 21, 2010.

  1. I am looking at this IAA and have no clue what they expect the students to have done as a practical as we don't do anything like this as a practical in our schemes and I can't find anything on the web. Any suggestions on set up, exquipment etc??? Much appreciated!
     
  2. I am looking at this IAA and have no clue what they expect the students to have done as a practical as we don't do anything like this as a practical in our schemes and I can't find anything on the web. Any suggestions on set up, exquipment etc??? Much appreciated!
     
  3. p1j39

    p1j39 New commenter

    It depends on which one you want to do:

    Topic 9 looks absolutely mental - dropping masses on a compressing spring and seeing how much each mass compresses the spring.

    Topic 11 is ok - shining light through different layers of tracing paper onto an LDR and measuring the current.

    In reality, both are ****! Why can't they pick practicals in Physics that teachersa actucally do, as they have for Biology and Chemistry.

    The sooner the DfE sort out these crappy science GCSEs the better!

    (rant over)
     
  4. sadscientist

    sadscientist Occasional commenter

    Upping this as we are now in the same position! One year on, any advice/experience to share, please anyone?
     
  5. We contacted the actual people who designed the spring practical.
    They admitted that it can't work under school lab circumstances in that the kids cannot possibly read the maximum compression when dropping the masses. They suggested that we just rest the masses atop the spring and read off the compression from that - this of course reduces it to merely a Hookes Law experiment.
    .
    We had to look around to purchase suitable springs because the original designer had comissioned a spring from an engineering firm specially for this practical.
    Since we are located in Cairo, this was pretty difficult.
    The springs we eventually used are largish and look like bed-springs. We mounted each spring on a board of wood and sleeved them using a section cut from a clear plastic 1.5 litre drinking water bottle. The plastic section we cut lengthwise to enable a pointer that we had fixed to the spring to project outwards. On the top of the spring we fixed a cardboard disc for the masses to rest upon.
    Don't worry too much, so long as you achieve some form of results and the kids are able to reproduce their plan for the IAA, you should be ok. Make sure you have a look at the IAA paper in advance so you know where the goalposts lie.
    Good luck.
     
  6. sadscientist

    sadscientist Occasional commenter

    Thanks robbywilliams for the advice, at least we know what we're up against. Have had similar problems with a Biology IAA and had to contact Edexcel, and the new spec Chemistry prac is downright dangerous with some groups, so p1/39 - so it's not just the Physics!
     
  7. p1j39

    p1j39 New commenter

    I tried this one. Even on top of sand paper the bloody thing doesn't move until about 200 g added then it shots across the table. Thank god it's not the real one this year. Gives me time to play.
     

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