1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice
  3. The Teacher Q&A will be closing soon.

    If you have any information that you would like to keep or refer to in the future please can you copy and paste the information to a format suitable for you to save or take screen shots of the questions and responses you are interested in.

    Don’t forget you can still use the rest of the forums on theTes Community to post questions and get the advice, help and support you require from your peers for all your teaching needs.

    Dismiss Notice

Early Years Workforce- Dissertation topic

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by EYPmidget, Jun 2, 2011.

  1. Hi,
    I was wondering if I could pick your brains. I am looking to do my MA dissertation on professionalism in the early years. It seems very current with the Tickell review recommending all staff being training to at least level 3. However I would more like to look at something around a gradute led workforce and Early Years Professional status. Maybe something around how to retain EYP's as many I know completed the training and then left the profession due to lack of pay, repsect from managers. I would maybe be also intersting to parents views.

    I was wondering if anyone would be willing to share any benefits, challenages, issues they may be facing in terms of profesionlism in the early years or if anyone has any ideas as to relevant current trends in early years professionalism.

    Thank you for any help or advice.
     
  2. Hi,
    I was wondering if I could pick your brains. I am looking to do my MA dissertation on professionalism in the early years. It seems very current with the Tickell review recommending all staff being training to at least level 3. However I would more like to look at something around a gradute led workforce and Early Years Professional status. Maybe something around how to retain EYP's as many I know completed the training and then left the profession due to lack of pay, repsect from managers. I would maybe be also intersting to parents views.

    I was wondering if anyone would be willing to share any benefits, challenages, issues they may be facing in terms of profesionlism in the early years or if anyone has any ideas as to relevant current trends in early years professionalism.

    Thank you for any help or advice.
     
  3. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    I think everyone knew that settings couldn't pay graduate wages to their staff and keep child care affordable.
     

  4. <font size="2">Within our local authority we received funding to complete our Foundation Degree, BA Hons In Early Years then to achieve Early Years Professional Status. The overall aim was to higher the standard in childcare and education. But sadly as the cohort have completed EYPS there is no jobs for EYPS within our local authority. </font>
     
  5. I think it is partly down to money and partly because it is a status that is unfamiliar to many and less well thought of than QTS. There are very few jobs advertised for EYPs - level 3 seems adequate for most posts. Maybe it has become a tool that employers can use to meet future requirements rather than a career progression for individuals. It seems a shame that there is no NQT year equivalent as that seems to affect people's perception of the status. I followed the FDa, BA, EYPS pathway and aside from my learning which was very worthwhile and really important to me, I am unsure that there are many other benefits. Time will tell...
     
  6. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    I think you have identified an important point ... I would also suggest it enabled the previous government to keep their promise of graduate led settings with no cost to themselves
     
  7. hurny

    hurny New commenter

    I worked in a pre-school for 10 years, I was manager for 5. I took the FDa then BA in the hope to move onto EYPS. But during my BA year, I sought advice about the best path to take and the advice (from an early years advisor) was to go for QTS as it was more widely recognised.
    So, I took the step and changed my career path. I am now a qualified teacher and I am very glad I did not take the EYPS. Looking at the job prospects and there is so much more out there for QTs. There are hardly any jobs that specify EYPS in my area, level 3-4 is about all that is asked for nursery managers.
    Another point, as a community pre-school manager, I was paid &pound;4000 less than when I changed jobs to become a nursery nurse and nearly &pound;10000 less than a qualified teacher!
     
  8. I was given similar advice but my circumstances made it impossible to do the PGCE. Despite all my efforts, a first class degree and over 15 years experience, I have had to accept that I could earn more working in a pub. I wouldn't change my job but I would like to be recognised as a professional, to have the prospect of a payscale, maybe a pension. As it seems that the EYPS is already being reviewed, I also wonder for how long it will be a recognised qualification.
     
  9. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    I think the point is EYPS has <u>never</u> been a qualification.

     
  10. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    Is it really impossible for you to do it now? Where does connon sense kick in?
     
  11. Of course you are right, Msz and that may be the problem. QTS is always linked to a relevant qualification like the PGCE or GTP and EYPS is not.
    Inky, you are right it would make sense to do the PGCE. Taking a year off work to train is not an option at the moment but I am hopeful that the govt will introduce a new training path for old pro's like me !
     
  12. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    I think it is very much part of the problem. I think calling something a status somehow detracts from the qualification you needed to gain the status if that makes sense.
     
  13. Exactly and that the degree does not have to be in Early Years just compounds the problem
     
  14. Hi everyone
    I did my degree part time whilst being manager of a playgroup and working as ETA in school. There was no funding then so I paid for it myself. I then applied to do a PGCE but ended up on the Graduate Teacher Programme and qualified over 4 years ago. I found a job and have since completed my MA in Early Childhood Studies and again have paid for it myself. However there have been many EYPS sudents attending some modules on the MA who have been given funding but have the same concerns that the money will run out soon and feel they are left with no options.
    However I would suggst that instead of seeing this in a negative light, it could be used to get on a PGCE or GTP and go for teaching. The additional academic and more importantly reflective nature of the EYPS would be a real bonus. To be honest if I was given the funding to do the EYPS I would jump at the chance but it has never been available to EYFS teachers in mainstream schools.


     
  15. Sorry if it seems negative - not my intention. I was thinking about the OP's question and the challenges and problems being faced by EY professionals. I agree that the EYPS is worthwhile in terms of learning and personal development and and would be valuable to those wanting to do their PGCE as well as those who are already teachers and want CPD opportunities. But surely that was not the point. EYPS was sold as a separate professional status with related but different skills. Surely, it was intended to raise standards across the whole sector. If ultimately it is not a stand-alone status and those who achieve it can only further their career by following the teacher training route, the value of EYPS comes into question. I feel lucky to have had really high quality funded training and am planning to stay in early years because I love it and consider it really important. I am sure that some EYPs will chose to leave though becuase their training has not brought the benefits that they hoped for.
     
  16. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    I agree EYPS was introduced as a status for those working with children from birth to 5 and intended to raise not only the standards but the public perception of those working with very young children. Staff working in maintained school settings were excluded from gaining the status and accessing the expertise as they didn't work withthe full age range. In addition those gaining EYPS were excluded from teaching in maintained school settings unless they already held QTS.
    The lack of opportunities and low level wages has understandably led to many EYPS holders gaining PGCE and QTS and for some to look for positions within the maintained sector which unfortunately removes their valuable expertise from the very settings that EYPS was intended to support.
    My personal feeling is that the expertise that EYPS brings is much needed but that the whole package wasn't thought through in detail leaving many feeling slightly frustrated .
     
  17. Wow- it seems I have opened a can of worms.
    Thank you for everyones comments, questions and for raising so many issues.
    I think this will be a really interesting piece of work, if I find the right focus for my research.
    One of the reasons I chose this topic was because I was fully supported by my manager during my time whilst completing my EYP pathway. However she left a month later and the new manager, I think did not recognise my EYPS and after a year, I left the setting for a role outside early years.Which is a shame beucase I love working in a setting but could'nt find a role that would reflect the EYPS I gained. I am always looking for jobs asking for EYP's but there are simply non, other than offering about 50p and hour extra for EYPS status (a joke if you aks me). Many EYP's are leaving the profession, something which I know is common in many area. It would be interesting to see what the reason for this is and if practitioners are offerned for gaining eyps and if this is followed through afterwards.

    Please keep you thoughts coming
     
  18. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

  19. Really interesting views! I feel there are several issues here about the EYPS:
    1. Pay scale, professional recognition by others, job satisfaction - which one ultimately defines your status and worth?
    2. The wider age range that an EYP is qualified to work with in comparison to a QTS: 0-5 v 3-5
    3. Correct me if Im wrong on this one but an EYP has a stronger grounding in the welfare aspects such as multi agency working/TAC/CAF (team around the child/ common assessment framework) than a QT - working in a children centre, as an outreach EYP trained it falls to me and not the teacher........
    4. This whole movement of a quality workforce was in response to early intervention so the whole surestart/ children centre movement, multiagency working, your TAC/CAF's, information sharing, working together to safegaurd children etc etc (there's a multitute of publications in response to early intervention). So, this had to be led by a graduate work force that had the skills to lead and support the delivery of a curriculum that encompassed the early intervention in terms of the welfare aspect of the EYFS.
    Thats why I had mentioned earlier about the EYPS having more of an understanding of the 0-3 age group because of the power of early intervention for children in this age gap.
    How much training do QT's have with this age group? Can a QT effectively support children within this age group - 0-3 usiong the EYFS? You can separtae the two age bands 0-3 being where you do all the intervention and preventative work (laying the foundation for the learning dispostions) and your 3-5 is where you start that prep for school (being very old fashioned here). So EYP's more grounding across the 0-5 than a QT's and so this boils down to where your interests lie.....is it the 3-5 yr olds only or 0-3's?

    As an outreach worker in a children centre you have a real sense and feel of how valuable your EYPS skills are as you are constantly drawing on your child development, play, theories and confidence in your own knowledge of the 0-5 age group during case conferences, child protection meetings, TAC's and multi disciplinary meetings.

    One day I maybe working with a midwife with a newborn in supporting a mother to bond with her little one, next I could be working with a 5yr old in school with a home school links worker on behaviour. So in my humble opinion to have the skills to work accross the age range and be valued by other professionals as resouce to call on in the community for early intervention is very rewarding!
     
  20. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Sorry you are wrong all our FS staff have undertaken TAC both CAF training (teachers and nursery nurses) and our nursery teacher provides support for the CC staff.
    I personally work with a huge range of agencies as the designated child protection teacher and SENCO.
    4 years at degree level and 2 years at MA level (Early childhood).
    The nursery teacher and I have also mentored a number of staff working in CC for their EYFD.
     

Share This Page