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Early years gun play!

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by lisaela, Dec 11, 2011.

  1. hello out there!
    Can you help me please I am writing a action research about gun play and I would really appreciate if people could answer these questions.......


    1)What
    is your policy when children use war/weapon play?





    2)Have you noticed any benefits to allowing gun/weapon play?

    3)Have you noticed any negative impact when gun/weapon play
    s taking place?

    4)Would you support a zero tollerance policy on gun/weapon play? (Please give
    reasons)
    Thanks!

     
  2. hello out there!
    Can you help me please I am writing a action research about gun play and I would really appreciate if people could answer these questions.......


    1)What
    is your policy when children use war/weapon play?





    2)Have you noticed any benefits to allowing gun/weapon play?

    3)Have you noticed any negative impact when gun/weapon play
    s taking place?

    4)Would you support a zero tollerance policy on gun/weapon play? (Please give
    reasons)
    Thanks!

     
  3. Hi,
    Personally, I don't really like children engaging in war play, however, it was pointed out to me that for children who have parents working in those environments, it is difficult to explain that its not OK to engage in that play in school. To those children, they are just acting out a job role in the way other children may play firemen or doctors. Consequently, I am careful now when observing such play and try to divert children's attention, rather than say outright 'No we don't play with guns.' I think it also depends on HOW children are playing- some are reenacting scenes from chidlren's programmes, whereas some become more violent- I think the adult's role and attitude needs to take into account the context the children are playing in.
     
  4. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

  5. Several places I have worked in have a 'no gun play' policy, but I feel a little ambivalent about it.One reason is that children will make guns with any objects they can find, so it's actually fighting something of a losing battle to 'ban' guns. Gun play tends to 'go underground' and happen behind adults backs. Maybe it's beter to accept it so that it can be monitored.Another thing is that, as it is mainly boys who play 'guns', the reaction of female adults could be a factor in making school a boy-unfriendly environment, and encouraging boys to feel that school is not for them.Role play is about acting out and imitating experiences, working through them and exploring social and emotional aspects. When playing with dolls children rehearse tender, caring behaviour. When playing with guns they rehearse aggression, anger, and also heroism. These are part of life and you could argue that they need rehearsing. And playing is fantasy, a safe way of exploring. If the play becomes violent in that children are being hurt or bullied, obviously the fantasy has spilled over into reality. Then there is a chance for children to learn the vital difference between fantasy and reality and find out about the lines that should not be crossed. However, it takes a sensitive and watchful practitioner to monitor gun play and in our understaffed classrooms it is hardly surprising that guns are banned in the interests of good order!
     
  6. cariad2

    cariad2 New commenter

    Last year I allowed gun play as part of a superhero game that my children were obsessed with. I did have some rules eg no running, put silencers on guns, don't point guns at anybody who isn't playing the game. The children loved the game and played it all year. But they did find it difficult to stick to the rules, and I was sick of it by the end of the year.
    This year I'm being a bit mean. I've banned gun play in the classroom, telling the children that it's too noisy for an indoor game. I haven't shown disapproval of gunplay itself, and am happy for it to happen outside.
     
  7. LauraJeanD

    LauraJeanD New commenter

    http://abcdoes.typepad.com/abc-does-a-blog/resourcesdraft.html


    go down to weapons/superhero play policy.
     
  8. lizzii_2008

    lizzii_2008 New commenter

    I think it is only natural for children to dip in and out of gunplay and although most teachers in the school want a zero tolerance policy on it, I actually don't think that is possible and is actually holding back a child's imagination and like a previous poster said such play could help a child determine reality from fantasy.
    After having read your post I spent today observing a particular group of boys play and they are very physical but in a role playing manner. There is hero is Ben 10 and I must admit I don't know much about him and what he does in the programme but the boys in my class love him. They also have a love for Spiderman and other superheroes.
    I watched a group of boys playing and a lot of the time the 'bad guys' were monsters and aliens and things that have a very negative association, so the 'guns' were being used in a good over evil manner. I spoke to one little boy and I asked him who uses guns and he told me the 'good guys' and that it was Soldiers who use them and related this to a time when he dressed as a soldier for Help for Heroes. I do think that if used in right manner then gunplay can be of some educational value and if saying 'no guns allowed at all ever' may confuse a child if they have a family member who is in the armed forces or the police etc.

     
  9. Leapyearbaby64

    Leapyearbaby64 New commenter

    We have a lot of gun play and the children make the guns from a selection of specific construction toys. We only allow the play outside as it is noisy and involves running about. We have observed it carefully and it is quite a complex game involving lots of cooperation and talk and is often based on a TV programme they have seen. Last year, a group of boys made other props needed for Ben 10 (wristbands etc) but it does get to the point where it is hard (well, I find it hard) to extend what they are doing. Like other areas of the classroom, we do sometimes limit what is available in the construction area, and this eliminates gun play and gets them involved in other things. With last year's cohort, they would have made guns out of cardboard tubes ... but this year they haven't cottoned onto that yet!
     
  10. katycustard

    katycustard Occasional commenter

    In our school lizzii, Ben 10 eats his ham sandwiches, fruit and has a drink, all with good manners! At least that's what I tell the children at lunch club when they don't want to eat - as in 'but Ben 10 eats all his sandwiches...' It never fails to work with our little ones!
    As for gun play, currently banned but we are having some Inset in January from a children's centre in Hull who do a lot of gun play and have published research in that area. I will wait and see before making any new decisions.
     

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