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e-petititons

Discussion in 'New teachers' started by historygrump, Aug 16, 2011.

  1. historygrump

    historygrump Occasional commenter Forum guide

    I posted a e-petition calling on the government to make it a legal requirement for anyone covering, supervising and teach classes in England to have QTS. I post it yesterday and apparently it can take up to 7 days for the government to approve it or reject it, depending on the department, etc. I will let everyone know when it is on the system.
    However there other petitions on the gov't site under 'the dept of education'
    1.Calling Micheal Gove to go as S of S for Education
    and for all the struggling NQT's out there
    2. Suggesting that the induction period should be scrapped.

     
  2. historygrump

    historygrump Occasional commenter Forum guide

    I posted a e-petition calling on the government to make it a legal requirement for anyone covering, supervising and teach classes in England to have QTS. I post it yesterday and apparently it can take up to 7 days for the government to approve it or reject it, depending on the department, etc. I will let everyone know when it is on the system.
    However there other petitions on the gov't site under 'the dept of education'
    1.Calling Micheal Gove to go as S of S for Education
    and for all the struggling NQT's out there
    2. Suggesting that the induction period should be scrapped.

     
  3. I think the problem you have here is the word teach'. Now I am not going to say whether I am in favour of this or not as I did a stint as cover supervisor prior to teaching training, so have been obn both sides of the 'divide' if you like. I will mention at this stage I was a CS in secondary but eventually trained to teach Primary, so my comments are based on that.
    Our job descriptions said to 'deliver' lessons that were left by the class teacher and to supervise the children. Now in theory this sounds great but in practice.... yeah right. Teachers often did not leave work or if they did would use the phrase 'the children know what they are doing' - OK great if the behaviour in a class was good or you had willing learners but not so great with your avergae class. We did have things up our cleeves and a bank of emergency lessons but I think the main benefit, was after doing this role for two years, I knew a lot of the kids. I also had a tutor group (year 7-13) so was an integral part of the school and did feel as though I had some investment in the job and the pupils - I cared about what was put in front of them and fought for that. Myself and another colleague would speak up when a class had a CS in front of them regularly and we sent some time time tracking pupils/classes and it made some interesting reading - often same classes had CSs in front of them. We also suggested that of the 6 lessons the deputy head taught, surely he could actually arrange his meetings at time OTHER THAN those 6 lessons to avoid using a CS.
    In the end I left the role, as not everyone took the role as seriously as I did and I was asked to cover a drama teacher until they could find a suitable replacement - 6 months later myself and another CS were still covering her classes (although we had gone to head after 3 weeks ragrding the Year 10/11 examination classes and made sure there was a qualified teacher teaching them).
    I don't think the problem is the use of CSs per se. I think for emergencies in schools there is a good argument for having these people in schools able to step in front of a class at short notice, particularly if they already know the school and routines and the children. However, many schools use them to avoid paying supply teachers and do not stick to the max of two weeks - now in something like RE or drama 2 weeks is probably only 2 lessons but in Maths this can be 6-8 lessons. School budgets are tight - so this option is also attractive.
    I did used to think it was more a problem in secondary until my last primary school that I worked in where HLTAs and CSs were used on a regular basis. On one particular day, for a variety of reasons, I was the only class teacher in KS2 - the other classes were all being covered by HLTAs, CSs or in one case a TA. They were all familiar with the children in these classes, so I could see the argument for this, but it still left me a little uneasy. I know the school has also appointed a CS to do PPA cover next year, rather than appoint a teacher...
    The trouble is this goes much deeper than just the notion of using CSs. Each CS is different. Some are passionate about what they do and genuinely fight more for the kids' rights than some teachers. Some are very good at what they do and again I have seen classes where children have actually learned more than when there is a teacher in front of them, however this practice seems to be unregulated and guidelines bent to the point of breaking as each day goes by.
    I am not sure what the answer is. I gues this discussion has been done a great many times in many of the forums and it brings out strong feelings on either side. I guess I have quite a unique (or maybe not so) perspective having been on both sides and I would have hated the thought that someone thought as a CS I could not do my job, but on the other hand, there were times when I was used by the school in a manner that was inappropriate and no one seemed to give a stuff!
     

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