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dyspraxia

Discussion in 'Special educational needs' started by jonowen, Jan 11, 2011.

  1. jonowen

    jonowen Occasional commenter

    Hi, I'm not sure what to do for the best. I have a pupil (S3) who I suspect is dyspraxic as he exhibits some symptons and strengths/skills associated with this condition. His mum is a colleague and she regularly apologises for his clumsiness, disorganisation and loudness. Having recently completed a uni module on SEN, I'm not sure if I'm over-reacting (and trying to diagnose too much) or if this pupil would really benefit from a more understanding approach (from all staff). He is loud and a nuisance, but likeable (as his mum!) (she's likeable but not loud!!)
    Can someone suggest my next step, especially if you have experience of teaching dyspraxic pupils?
    Thanks in advance.
    Joni
     
  2. jonowen

    jonowen Occasional commenter

    Hi, I'm not sure what to do for the best. I have a pupil (S3) who I suspect is dyspraxic as he exhibits some symptons and strengths/skills associated with this condition. His mum is a colleague and she regularly apologises for his clumsiness, disorganisation and loudness. Having recently completed a uni module on SEN, I'm not sure if I'm over-reacting (and trying to diagnose too much) or if this pupil would really benefit from a more understanding approach (from all staff). He is loud and a nuisance, but likeable (as his mum!) (she's likeable but not loud!!)
    Can someone suggest my next step, especially if you have experience of teaching dyspraxic pupils?
    Thanks in advance.
    Joni
     
  3. Please note that a significant number of developmental 'disorders' have no known cause and are based on descriptions of the child's difficulties. It does not follow that each child with a specific diagnosis has the same issues as another child with the same diagnosis. Dorothy Bishop has recently posted an insightful article on this very issue here;
    http://deevybee.blogspot.com/search?updated-min=2010-01-01T00%3A00%3A00Z&updated-max=2011-01-01T00%3A00%3A00Z&max-results=19
    Descriptive labels can be useful because they can point you to information about other children with similar difficulties and what strategies have been useful in supporting them, but as Dodros implies, identifying a child's specific problems and what you do about them, is more important than assigning a medical label.




     
  4. jonowen

    jonowen Occasional commenter

    Thanks to you both. I do appreciate that it sounds as if I want to "label" this pupil, I don't - I'm trying to improve his learning experience because I care about how pupils learn.
    I will have a look at the information you recommend, thanks again.
     

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