1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Dyscalculia and SEN in maths - courses?

Discussion in 'Mathematics' started by mancduck, Mar 15, 2007.

  1. Hi

    I am in the middle of trying to complete a professional review form (oh the joys) and am interested in understanding more clearly how I can help the SEN pupils with their maths.

    We currently have one conformed dyscalculic and numerous dyslexics.

    Does anyone know of any courses on this or any invaluable books?

    Many thanks

    :)
     
  2. Hi

    I am in the middle of trying to complete a professional review form (oh the joys) and am interested in understanding more clearly how I can help the SEN pupils with their maths.

    We currently have one conformed dyscalculic and numerous dyslexics.

    Does anyone know of any courses on this or any invaluable books?

    Many thanks

    :)
     
  3. mancduck - Thank heavens that dyscalculia is being taken seriously; I believe that it's been overlooked for too long.

    I've come across a few children who find English, science, French and music easy - but maths is impossible for them, they don't seem to have a template of numbers in their head and by the time they reach senior school they've stopped trying to learn.

    If these children had been spotted in the early years I?m sure they would have found ways to cope.
     
  4. invalauble books:
    the chapter on mathematics in
    'how children think and learn' David Wood ( umpteenth edition by now I think.)and anything by Tom Carpenter, Liz Fennema, James Hiebert, Paul Cobb, Jo Boaler, Julie Anghileri

    Children with learning difficulties construct the same mathematical conceptualisations as typical children. As teachers if we understood children's mathematical thinking better and worked from that basis and taught for relational understanding rather than procedural competency then perhaps fewer children would expereince difficulty in developing useful mathematical understanding.

    You might find some of the maths recovery material of value as well. It is perhaps worth noting that only a small minority of children are recognised as being dyscalculaic, however a considerable number of children experience difficulty in developing mathematical understanding because they have not experienced mathematics as a sense-making activity. Probably as much a result of the way we are encouraged to teach as anything else.

     
  5. I'm curious about this from a personal as well as a professional point of view.

    Despite the fact that I'm a good mathematician I am really hopeless at mental arithmetic, particularly addition and subtraction. I also get beaten out of sight (even by bottom set y7s) when estimating angles and lengths.

    I don't know whether this has been a lifelong thing, as I have very few memories before the age of 20 due to having had some degree of brain damage resulting from eclampsia when giving birth to my son. I got my maths degree after this and don't have trouble dealing with abstract concepts, just basic arithmetic and estimation.

     
  6. emilyisobel: I can't comment on your specific situation, but many young children develop inefficiencies in arithmetic because of they way they are taught. Children come to school with an informal understanding of all the operations. These natural understandings are seldom built on, instead young children are generally are taught to develop procedural skills which often make little sense and concepts are introduced in a sequence that has little to do with children's natural development and understanding. For example multiplication and measurement division is usually introduced after place value, when in fact children can use their understanding of multiplication and certain types of division to develop their understanding of place value. I would argue that for many children, learing difficulties in mathematics are the result of pedagogical approaches used.
     
  7. ragpicker - Do you believe that too many ways to do simple sums are taught too early?
     
  8. Most children come to school with an informal understanding of all the operations. This understanding can be built on. In this respect children have a variety of strategies for solving problems at their disposal.

    The problem arises when we 'teach' them specific ways that make little sense and which fail to help them develop relational thinking. So showing them a range of differnet and sometimes seemingly disconnected methods is justb confusing. It also reinforces the idea in the pupils mind that there is a correct way of solving problems that needs to be shown by the teacher and which is the one that they should follow.

    These statements are not opinion, there is a significant body of research evidence and literature behind them. If you are interested I can point you in that direction.
     
  9. I have just read your post on dyscalculia and am very interested in the research that you mention. (better late than never)

    I am a 4th year student doing a BA Hons in Primary Education. I am conducting research on dyscalculia for my dissertation, and any information would be greatly appreciated.


     
  10. Hello
    I have just been doing some research on dyscalculia for my degree in Childhood Studies in the TES and you mentioned in one of your replies on the forum that you were doing a dissertation on this subject matter. I would be very interested to know how you got on please. I have just chosen this area - i support a lower ability maths class with a child who was diagnosed with dyslexia last year and he definately has difficulty in maths and would like to support him better - what would you suggest?
    Any information you could offer would be great if you have the time.
    Thankyou Lisa
     
  11. DM

    DM New commenter

    Lisa, you are addressing a poster who made one post on TES some time ago. Little chance of a response I would think.
     
  12. I know but its worth a try!!!
     

Share This Page