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Dry ice risk assesment and safety issues.

Discussion in 'Science' started by nick909, Jan 14, 2012.

  1. nick909

    nick909 Star commenter

    Hello. On the assumption that dry ice might be used relatively frequently in secondary, (I teach primary), I wanted to garner some advice on using dry ice.
    What would any risk assessment involve?
    What are the safety issues, other than ensuring no skin contact is made?
    What safety equipment is necessary? Gloves and goggles?
    I'd only have one small, supervised group working with the ice at a time, of course.
    I'd be using it to make ice cream. Heston Blumenthal inspired.
     
  2. nick909

    nick909 Star commenter

    Hello. On the assumption that dry ice might be used relatively frequently in secondary, (I teach primary), I wanted to garner some advice on using dry ice.
    What would any risk assessment involve?
    What are the safety issues, other than ensuring no skin contact is made?
    What safety equipment is necessary? Gloves and goggles?
    I'd only have one small, supervised group working with the ice at a time, of course.
    I'd be using it to make ice cream. Heston Blumenthal inspired.
     
  3. blazer

    blazer Star commenter

    If you can get dry ice then good luck. My industrial 'lender' stopped using it ages ago. Apart from as a curiosity I have never used it in school.

    Dry ice has a temperature below -77 degrees C. As you say skin contact should be avoided.
    Also any restriction in terms of space is a no no. It should not be stored, used or transported in any sealed vessel unless approved . When had a real job we had 'bombs' that were pressure proofed up to 2000psi in which we could seal small quantities of dry ice.
     
  4. blazer

    blazer Star commenter

    It should also be used in a well ventilated space.
     
  5. BelleDuJour

    BelleDuJour Star commenter

    It's very expensive nick. I'd probably not use it in school anyway as I can't see a use for it in the classroom. It also doesn't keep so you could spend £50 on dry ice only to watch almost all of it just sublime into carbon dioxide!
    Nice idea for the ice cream but I'd leave it to Heston!
     
  6. See CLEAPSS Hazcard 20 and section 11.2 of the Laboratory Handbook. You will be able to access these at school because you have there the user name and password to get in.(By the way these will be changing at the end of this month!)
    Alternativey, you can use salt/ice mixture to make ice cream, see http://chemistry.about.com/cs/howtos/a/aa020404a.htm. However, if you are going to taste it, you need to do this in the home economics dept which is a cleaner environment than the lab.
    .
     
  7. nick909

    nick909 Star commenter

    Blazer, Belle and Boilingtube - thanks loads for the advice.
     

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