1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Drop in clauses

Discussion in 'Primary' started by senorcalvo, Nov 14, 2010.

  1. senorcalvo

    senorcalvo New commenter

    Hi, i have identified with my year 6 that there
    are not very good at this and was wondering if anybody could help me
    with this. Are there any good tips for these or decent websites or
    worksheets to use?





    Regards


    Chris
     
  2. senorcalvo

    senorcalvo New commenter

    Hi, i have identified with my year 6 that there
    are not very good at this and was wondering if anybody could help me
    with this. Are there any good tips for these or decent websites or
    worksheets to use?





    Regards


    Chris
     
  3. When I teach this, I always follow this sequence:
    * Explain that a clause adds more detail to a sentence, and wouldn't make sense if it appeared on its own.
    * Explain that drop in clauses about an object usually start with "which"
    * Explain that drop in clauses about person/named animal usually start with "who"
    * Comma before and after clause;
    * Demonstrate:
    The cave, which was dark and damp, smelt musty.
    The man, who was very tall, walked slowly down the street.
    * Give them a sentence to begin with and ask them to drop in their own clause, using whiteboards to record them.
    This normally works very well.
     
  4. senorcalvo

    senorcalvo New commenter

    That's great. Will use this tomorrow. Thanks a lot.
    Regards
    Chris
     
  5. Getrichquick, that was a very well put lesson.
     
  6. Cervinia

    Cervinia Occasional commenter

    Activity: give chn 3 simple sentences (to do with theme), typed onto strips of paper. Give them strips of coloured paper to insert into sentences. Discuss use of ,which clause in middle or at end of sentence, depending on which noun/subject is being expanded upon. Cut/stick onto a3 paper.
     
  7. nick909

    nick909 Lead commenter

    I can't remember where I originally got it from, but I've been doing this for years. I start off with a picture of a cartoon Hell's Angel biker (plenty of images on the net), called Spudface and invite description about him, and then similarly with a cartoon fluffy rabbit. Then identify the subject, verb and object in the following simple sentence, and have them colour coded appropriately as such:
    Spudface bought a rabbit.
    We then do examples of inserting a drop in clause or phrase, and adding further description.
    eg.
    Spudface, who was a dirty, smelly biker, bought a pink fluffy rabbit.
    Clearly this is just an example and the children should come up with lots of far better ideas.
    There are obviously lots of opportunities to extend this, by adding conjunctions and clauses before and after the starter sentence.
    Lots of silly or funny sentences often ensue, and the children always seem to enjoy it and remember it when referring back to it.
    We then look at other simple or compound sentences and practise inserting clauses.

     
  8. This is broadening away from just drop in clauses, but another activity is the challenge to write the longest sentence you can. I start with 4 or 5 words in a simple sentence, then it is redrafted and ever expanded. Children often get to around 80-90 words, which would include many drop in clauses. Some have made around 150 words. I found it a good exercise for improving fluency and speed, even reluctant writers have got swept along. The knack is also to steer away from setting up a new sentence, omitting full stops where they belong not being allowed, of course.
     

Share This Page