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Driving ability

Discussion in 'Personal' started by florapost, Feb 4, 2011.

  1. discussions on my previous thread had me pondering -
    there is some daft statistic out there that 80% or some such of drivers reckon their driving ability is 'above average' - go figure
    me - i admit, i'm a below average driver - so -
    i drive an automatic - the petrol consumption i can live with for the fewer things to concentrate on
    i do daft 7 point turns in my drive to avoid backing out
    i tell passengers to 'shut up' when , say, appraoching a roundabout (they know why!!)
    i never drive above 60 - well, i have a micra, it doesn't like above 60 anywayi
    i have a micra
    i never go above the speed limit (once - at 6.30am, i misunderstood urban duel carriageways - of course i got caught) unless i'm likely to induce road rage and stupid overtaling if i don't keep up with the traffic stream
    i never drive after a drop of alcohol
    etc etc
    am i a wimp?

     
  2. discussions on my previous thread had me pondering -
    there is some daft statistic out there that 80% or some such of drivers reckon their driving ability is 'above average' - go figure
    me - i admit, i'm a below average driver - so -
    i drive an automatic - the petrol consumption i can live with for the fewer things to concentrate on
    i do daft 7 point turns in my drive to avoid backing out
    i tell passengers to 'shut up' when , say, appraoching a roundabout (they know why!!)
    i never drive above 60 - well, i have a micra, it doesn't like above 60 anywayi
    i have a micra
    i never go above the speed limit (once - at 6.30am, i misunderstood urban duel carriageways - of course i got caught) unless i'm likely to induce road rage and stupid overtaling if i don't keep up with the traffic stream
    i never drive after a drop of alcohol
    etc etc
    am i a wimp?

     
  3. No, you need a refresher course and perhaps some motorway training. Costs a few quid but may save yours or somebody else's life. The importance of refresher courses from the ROSPA website...

    Introduction

    Driving a car is an essential part of personal, family and work life for over 30 million people in the UK. Between us,we drive some 2.5 billion miles each year. It can be enjoyable and pleasant, but also stressful and dangerous.

    Car drivers in the UK are involved in well over 100,000 crashes each year in which around 2,600 people are killed, 26,000 seriously injured and 250,000 slightly injured. This is the tip of an iceberg. Tens of thousands more people are taken to hospital, or treated by first aid or GPs in unreported crashes.

    Of course, it is not always the driver who is at fault, but our ability to anticipate and cope with the mistakes and misbehaviour of other people is just as important as our own driving skills and attitudes.

    Everyone develops their own driving style and habits over time, and we often do not realise (or do not want to accept) that we could improve our driving, even though this would make driving safer, less stressful and more enjoyable.

    What is Refresher Driver Training?

    The term ?Refresher Driver Training? includes a wide range of different courses, including:

    Simple assessment drives
    Courses for anxious drivers or people who have not driven for a long time
    Courses on specific skills, such as towing or parking
    Courses for older drivers
    Local Authority Better Driving courses
    Driver development training (often provided by employers)
    Advanced driver training
    Remedial training, such as Driver Improvement or Speed Awareness courses.
    It ranges from quick and easy training that focuses on specific issues or skills to longer courses leading to full advanced driving tests that require more commitment. . Other courses are run by professional driving instructors and have to be paid for.

    These are a useful way for people to update their driving knowledge and skills and to get impartial professional advice on their driving.

    This Toolkit is designed to help anyone who provides or promotes driver training to:

    raise awareness about the existence of refresher driver training explain what it involves
    promote its benefits
    suggest ways to overcome deterrents to undertaking further driver training
     
  4. Sorry about the lack of paragraphs. You'd have thought TES would have made the site fully usable for other browsers by now. Ho hum.
     
  5. oh- forgot to add - did the motorway course 2 years ago
    nothing can make us all above average drivers - i think it's better to acknowledge how you are
    and - an asda lorry being blown into your inside lane by high winds when there's no hard shoulder cos of road works - the course did not cover that
     
  6. giraffe

    giraffe New commenter

    I am hoping to have my last driving lesson tomorrow.

     
  7. Why ?Are you planning a thelma and louise?
     
  8. giraffe

    giraffe New commenter

    When I told my husband I was hoping to have last lesson tomorrow, he absent mindedly replied in what he thought was a supportive way
    'no, I'm sure you'll have.......er... I mean...'




    Not Thelma and Louise - although this time last week, after a lesson created in the bowels of Hades, I could well have been looking for a cliff to plumett from
     
  9. giraffe

    giraffe New commenter

    florapost
    I bet all those speeding, selfish, overtaking-at-any-risk drivers also think they are above average.
    Good driving means different things to different people.
    Careful, considerate and safe are what I'd like to meet coming the other way, not some bloke who thinks he's got skill just because he can steer with his elbow whilst using a mobile phone as he overtakes three vehicles at once!
     
  10. doomzebra

    doomzebra Occasional commenter

    "Duel carriageway" implies a more aggresive driving style than the one to which the OP is admitting.
     
  11. kibosh

    kibosh Star commenter

    Daft is the word for it. The stat is meaningless. How many of those drivers have been involved in incidents/accidents? How many of them have forced other drivers to take sudden/drastic action to AVOID the results of their 'above average' driving? Without a precise breakdown of their driving history, that stat tells us only one thing:Egotistical PLONKERS.
    Me on the other hand, I'm great [​IMG]

     
  12. I think im an OK driver in terms of being reactive to road situations. I think thats the most important thing, regardless of what speed etc you are comfortable at and how good you are at manouvres - you need to be able to react to things happening around you quickly and effectively.
    I cant park though!
    Im cross today because when I was waiting at a roundabout, somebody just rolled into the back of me. They werent going very fast but obviously thought I had gone when I hadnt. I understand mistakes happen but what made me cross was I assumed they would follow me left and pull over - just to assess damage - but they carried straight on over the roundabout.
    I pulled over and theres little more than scuffed paint on my bumper, but it wouldve been nice to get an apology and an offer to pay for a repaint.
    Though in hindsight, my car is currently so dirty that you couldnt tell there was a scratch until I wiped the dust away [​IMG]
     
  13. nah -much more boring than that - i am used to the A41, which is 40/50mph speed limit
    the road in question is duel carriageway, but 30mph - driving down there during the tube strike to get master post to school and get to work myself i didn't think - if you check your highway code, urban duel carriageways are still all 30mph unless you see a sign to the contrary - given there was not another car in sight at the unearthly hour i sped up to 40 and was lucky enough to be clocked at 38
     
  14. doomzebra

    doomzebra Occasional commenter

    *wooshing sound overhead
     
  15. kibosh

    kibosh Star commenter

    How long will it take? The penny is falling . . . . . . . .
     
  16. Chica77

    Chica77 New commenter

    DuAl carriageway Flora!!
    I don't think you're a wimp because you stick to the speed limit and don't drink drive! That's just being sensible!
    I think i've become much more cautious as i've got older, and now I have a child and am soon to have another. I would never drink drive, but I have been known to drive too fast! Obviously I am now very careful in my mummymobile!
    I live in a flat and only have on-road parking, so my parallel parking skills have improved a lot.
    I don't do a lot of long distance driving these days, i think i've lost a bit of confidence as I haven't done a long drive for a while. I have driven in the US (San Francisco no less!), France and Switzerland, but that was quite a few years ago now.

     
  17. oops [​IMG] have posted elsewher - have had a sh*t 2 days and am swaying with trirdness
    and me such a world-famous pedant [​IMG]
     
  18. giraffe

    giraffe New commenter


    I misread that as something you HADN'T done for two days, LoL! Was about to recommend dried apricots.
     
  19. hmmm, my driving ability...
    Decide for yourself.
    I can reverse and parallel park without going backwards and forwards.
    I drive fast on the motorway, in the appropriate lane (we have no speed limit on some stretches here).
    I use my indicator to indicate that I intend to change direction.
    I use the "zipper" mode of pulling into a lane (as most Germans do - this is a bit of a pain in the UK as nobody seems to do it).
    I stick to speed limits (mostly!) when they are applicable.
    I keep my distance from the car in front.
    I get annoyed with people who drive up my a.rse.
    I never drive if I have drunk alcohol.
    I drive more circumspectly when my children are in the car.
    I am not comfortable as a passanger and hate to not be the driver. I will tolerate it with gritted teeth.
    I no longer need a lot of horse power, 55 ps is fine.
    I know where to put the petrol in, check the oil, the water and the anti-freeze.
    I can change a tyre but prefer a man to do it, as I don't like to get my clothes dirty or exert myself when a smile and a pretend helpless mode will get the job done much quicker and to my satisfaction.
    I theoretically know who to do an oil change, but apply the same rules as for changing tyres.
    I also apply these rules for jump starting a car.
    You have to leave the guys something to do.

     
  20. i'm fine, thanks [​IMG]
     

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