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Drama Teachers HELP!!!

Discussion in 'Drama and performing arts' started by lauraneary1, Apr 13, 2011.

  1. Hi guys, my name is Laura and I am interested in looking at the difference between 'Drama' and 'Acting' for my MA dissertation. So.... I was wondering if any of you Drama teachers teach acting techniques such as Stanislavski, breathing, being in the space, reacting in the moment etc...??

    I know that Drama in schools is intended to enhance a pupils understanding of social issues and other perspectives and to increase their confidence/social skills. However, I am looking at devising a workshop of acting techniques and seeing if this 'internal perspective' allows them to relate to the character more thus, allowing them to truly engage in the perspective of that person as opposed to externally seeing their point. I would like students to perhaps feel what this situation is like so their understanding is deeper.

    Any views on this would be appreciated and If anyone has used any of these techniques on KS4 pupils then please let me know how it went!

    Many thanks,

    Laura x
     
  2. This is a follow up to my previous reply
    ' I know that Drama in schools is intended to enhance a pupils understanding of social issues and other perspectives and to increase their confidence/social skills.'
    I don't think this statement is a very good summary of the aim of drama in schools. most drama teachers I know would take issue with it. You're doing an MA, don't make unsupported assertions. Do your research. Do an internet check on what drama teachers actually teach: many schools put their curriculum, including drama, on their websites. You will find that social issue based drama rarely figures or if it does it appears as a discrete slot.
    Similarly, while it is often stated that drama in schools enhances social confidence there is almost no evidence to support this piece of drama folklore. I've been teaching drama for 40 years and have have rarely, if ever, seen it happen. I have seen students become more confident in the specific context of drama lessons but there is no evidence to suggest that this confidence becomes transferrable to a more general social confidence. In my experience it is usually the more socially confident students who are drawn to drama.
     
  3. Yes, I echo the above. You don't want to make any generaliations.
    Although I was once told that all learners have to do to get a passing grade in the latter practical units of GCSE is to 'speak and move.' Certainly to access the higher grades a learner has to apply some understanding of characterisation, physicality, and voice.
    Additionally, A level (Edexcel, anyway) learners have to show an understanding of actor training practice.
    I would certainly say that from say, key stage 3 most teachers would be introducing at least Stanislavsky.
    Have a look at the schemes and resources on TES to see what sort of concepts are being used. Also, have a look at these guys:
    http://www.stanislavskiexp.co.uk/ - I think the main guy has a book out too.
    Its tricky finding something juicy to research (I finished my MA last year) good luck with it all!
    Best,
    Mr Pink
     
  4. Laura, you have a couple of rearch problems,
    If you want to find out what teachers actually teach it is no good going to any of the suggested websites; they will merely tell you what teachers are recommended to teach; it won't tell you what they actually do. Not many drama teachers belong to or contribute to this or other egroups; you will find that the same names crop up all the time. I meet and know a lot of drama teachers and very few of them subscribe to the web sites. When I want to find out what people teach I tend to start with the schools in one local authority and search through the websites of each school. Not all schools put their drama curriculum on line but many do. When you have found out which schools teach Stanislavski you could write direct. Or better still interview the teachers in your area.
    'However, I am looking at devising a workshop of acting techniques and seeing if this 'internal perspective' allows them to relate to the character more thus, allowing them to truly engage in the perspective of that person as opposed to externally seeing their point. I would like students to perhaps feel what this situation is like so their understanding is deeper.'
    You can only find this out by asking students who have been through the process. How can teacher's possibly know? Unfortunately students have a habit of telling teachers what they want to hear. If a drama teacher who they like has spent hours doing something for their exams asks the question 'did this allow you to truly engage in the perspective of the person' they are likely to say 'yes' just to please teacher and get a good exam grade.The respondent giving the answer they think you want to hear is an age old research problem. And of course the enthusiastic drama teacher will want to believe them because it validates their work.
    My guess is that you are asking a question to which there is not an easy answer. Maybe you need to ask a different question.
     

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