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Doing as told but s-l-o-w-l-y...

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by Justmelg, Mar 3, 2011.

  1. Please advise! I'm a TA and take an upper primary class for PPA once a week. I'm having problems with one boy in the class who has a bit of an attitude.
    One week he was very awkward and I sent him out; he spent a very dull afternoon on the floor in the HT office. Since then he has done as I have asked, but very slowly. 'Give x their ruler back' and it's like stop frame animation. His response to 'Sit down on the carpet, like everyone else,' is almost balletic.
    Am I being overly critical? Should I just be happy he's doing as I ask? I feel like I should know this but I don't.
     
  2. Please advise! I'm a TA and take an upper primary class for PPA once a week. I'm having problems with one boy in the class who has a bit of an attitude.
    One week he was very awkward and I sent him out; he spent a very dull afternoon on the floor in the HT office. Since then he has done as I have asked, but very slowly. 'Give x their ruler back' and it's like stop frame animation. His response to 'Sit down on the carpet, like everyone else,' is almost balletic.
    Am I being overly critical? Should I just be happy he's doing as I ask? I feel like I should know this but I don't.
     
  3. Me? I'd include the time element in the instruction.
    Please give Jane her ruler now. Please move to your place promptly. Put down your pencils immediately. But I'd only do this if I was primed and ready to go with a sanction for failure to comply.
     
  4. Classic attention seeking. If you are likely to be looking/glaring at him while waiting for him to complete the task then he has you (and most likely the rest of the classes) full attention. Give the instruction, then as he starts to comply, move on as if it has been completed properly and remove the attention element. Also praise those around him for ignoring such behaviours. If he is upper primary, he clearly knows that this behaviour is not appropriate. A quiet chat that what is clear that he is doing, and a warning of what will happen next time he makes fun of such an instruction by going slow motion may be a good idea, then follow through with that sanction straight away the behaviour is repeated.
     
  5. Thank so much for your advice, I have absorbed it ready for next PPA time!
     

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