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Doing an MA

Discussion in 'Personal' started by gemmamarie08, Apr 2, 2012.

  1. gemmamarie08

    gemmamarie08 New commenter

    Hi everyone [​IMG]
    Just looking for some general thoughts/opinions really. I am currently employed full time in a mentoring role (I am a fully qualified teacher but successfully applied for this role as I felt it suited my skills and ambitions).
    I really enjoy my job and find it very rewarding and interesting. I'm in my mid twenties in a stable relationship. I have a house with my partner (who is also emloyed) and we have no children.
    I am thinking of applying to do an MA in inclusive education and SEN part-time so I can follow my interest while still working. I'm aware of the demands of studying at this level as my PGCE included some M-Level credits.
    I have a specific interest in SEN and much of my work involves working with pupils who have SEN which is why I am thinking of that particular course. Eventually I would like to work in a special needs environment.
    Has anyone else done an MA in SEN (or Education?) and if so how did you find it? Has it helped you in your job or enabled you to get another job in a particular field?
    Thanks in advance for any info!
     
  2. gemmamarie08

    gemmamarie08 New commenter

    Hi everyone [​IMG]
    Just looking for some general thoughts/opinions really. I am currently employed full time in a mentoring role (I am a fully qualified teacher but successfully applied for this role as I felt it suited my skills and ambitions).
    I really enjoy my job and find it very rewarding and interesting. I'm in my mid twenties in a stable relationship. I have a house with my partner (who is also emloyed) and we have no children.
    I am thinking of applying to do an MA in inclusive education and SEN part-time so I can follow my interest while still working. I'm aware of the demands of studying at this level as my PGCE included some M-Level credits.
    I have a specific interest in SEN and much of my work involves working with pupils who have SEN which is why I am thinking of that particular course. Eventually I would like to work in a special needs environment.
    Has anyone else done an MA in SEN (or Education?) and if so how did you find it? Has it helped you in your job or enabled you to get another job in a particular field?
    Thanks in advance for any info!
     
  3. dogcat

    dogcat New commenter

    Hiya,
    I am doing part time MA in Education with two SEN modules first yr this year. Got a merit in my first essay which I was really pleased with. I will be spending a fair bit of thr Easter holidays doing uni work, and I have to be strict with myself over next few weeks until next essay is due in.
    It is doable part time, but you have to be prepared to give up a fair bit of time for the reading and the essay writing. I am hoping to pass this year, critical study will be quite hard to do whilst working full time I imagine.
     
  4. Hi Gemma,

    I work as a mentor and am currently studying for a MSc pt. Studying for a masters and working full time is certainly do-able but it is incredibly draining. I spend one Sunday afternoon a week and part of the holidays studying.

    I started the MSc when I was a teacher and found it a lot easier than now when I work as a mentor. By the time it comes to the weekend I am often emotionally drained and long for a good rest however thoughts of my studies are always at the back of my mind. I'd like to eventually work in a university based role so I know the masters will help me to achieve this.
     
  5. The fees for doing part-time higher degrees have recently increased sharply. I looked into doing one at Birbeck but, starting in September, it was £900+ per term.
     
  6. gargs

    gargs Star commenter

    Hi,
    I'm currently doing an MA through the OU. I will have to do three modules because my PGCE was over 6 or 7 years ago, but it sounds as if you might only have to do two modules as you would get some credits from your PGCE.
    I'm really enjoying the course but it is hard work. I have pretty much given up watching tv (not necessarily a bad thing!) and spend several nights a week reading the course materials. The essays are timed so that they are due just after each holiday - great for catching up, but not so great if you like to relax in the holidays!
    The module I'm doing at the moment isn't entirely relevant but it is making me think more about how I teach, so it's useful in that respect. My next module will hopefully have a greater impact.
    I don't know whether having the extra letters after my name will make any difference to my career but I'm doing it for the fun of it as much as anything.
    Go for it, you've got nothing to lose!
     
  7. Go for it - I did my MA - in my subject - whilst running a department full of non specialists, working full time and with two teenagers as well as a big commitment outisde of school! It's all about being organised!
     
  8. gemmamarie08

    gemmamarie08 New commenter

    Thanks for all your replies! I think I'm going to go for it! If I don't do it now I don't think I ever will lol[​IMG]
    Plus an advantage of the course is that you can do a PGDip if you decide you want to finish early.
    Thanks again [​IMG]
     
  9. Richie Millions

    Richie Millions New commenter

    Well done good to see ambition, planning and forethought you will do well I am sure x
     

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