1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded education professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Does it really get easier?

Discussion in 'NQTs and new teachers' started by Blind_Faith, Feb 16, 2012.

  1. I remember having been told over and over again to stick with teaching because 'it gets easier', but I'm just struggling to see it. I know a lot of it depends on the school and how organised you are, but I just wanted to know whether it is the norm even after 5 years (for example) of teaching that you still have to do reams of work in the evenings and at the weekends?
    I am quite a completionist/perfectionist with my work so you can probably see the predicament I am in as I'm struggling to get any job satisfaction. There have been times when I have been super organised to try and free up time later in the week, but this 'free time' then ends up getting filled with some other job out of the blue. So I just wanted to know whether there really is any light at the end of that tunnel!
     
  2. I remember having been told over and over again to stick with teaching because 'it gets easier', but I'm just struggling to see it. I know a lot of it depends on the school and how organised you are, but I just wanted to know whether it is the norm even after 5 years (for example) of teaching that you still have to do reams of work in the evenings and at the weekends?
    I am quite a completionist/perfectionist with my work so you can probably see the predicament I am in as I'm struggling to get any job satisfaction. There have been times when I have been super organised to try and free up time later in the week, but this 'free time' then ends up getting filled with some other job out of the blue. So I just wanted to know whether there really is any light at the end of that tunnel!
     
  3. Captain Obvious

    Captain Obvious New commenter

    After a while you do find yourself just finding out the presentation/resources you used last year rather than planning out each lesson labouriously, and in some instances you'll make a lesson up 5 minutes before it starts and somehow get away with it (thanks to experience).
    I'm still always behind on marking, particularly when it comes to lower years (priorities and all that).
    It improves, but with the condition that it depends on your subject and what effect curriculum changes, either government- or exam board-led, have on it.
     
  4. Yes it does definately get easier, so hang on in there! I was working until 10pm almost every evening and for a whole day at the weekend during my NQT, but now my workload is much more manageable. I'm in my third year, and I now finally have a life outside teaching! I tend to get into work by 8pm and leave about 6pm, and I don't take work home in the evening. I may do some work at the weekend if I haven't had the heart to stay at school after 4pm on a Friday, or if I have things like reports to write or mock exams to mark.
    I have found that doing my work at school, rather than home, to be the key to a decent lifestyle. In the previous two years, I would come home about 4pm-5pm, and then it would take an age to get work done in the evening, when I really resented it. Now I see school as my "office" and if it doesn't get done in office hours, it isn't getting done, and I manage. I don't think working from 8am-6pm with 13 weeks holiday a year is that bad in a professional job. I am making much better use of my PPA or free periods, I avoid other members of staff during frees so that I can get a decent amount of work done, but I also ensure I have a good break and a natter at lunch time.
    You will be able to recycle reources next year, so make sure you keep them safe. Planning generally gets quicker the more experience you have, and although you may feel you don't have the time, its always a good investment to observe other teachers. Keep a note of any ideas you get from others, or activities that have worked well, so you can dip into this as a "toolbox" of activities whenever you are too tired to think of something new. If you find an activity has worked well with one class, try it out on all your others - recycle, recyle, recycle! If anything its the marking that tends to suffer for me, as there isn't actually enough time to do everything perfectly, but unless you have a conflicting policy in your school, you don't need to mark everything. Set homework that can be peer or self assessed, or a "learn" homework that you can check with a quiz next lesson. Try to lose the perfectionist streak, pretty resources do not really do much to enhance learning, and as long as you're checking pregress in some way, Year 7 won't fail that test if their books don't get marked for a month or so.
     

  5. I wish I could be like that! It always feels like there's never an end to the list of jobs, which makes it difficult to get any job satisfaction.
     

Share This Page