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Does a schools religious ethos benefit teaching and learning?

Discussion in 'Religious Education' started by HLeighton, Mar 26, 2011.

  1. I'm currently researching this subject for my dissertation but as I'm only undertaking a small scale study I am interested in colleagues responses especially from those with multi faith or non christian demographics.
     
  2. I'm currently researching this subject for my dissertation but as I'm only undertaking a small scale study I am interested in colleagues responses especially from those with multi faith or non christian demographics.
     
  3. durgamata

    durgamata Occasional commenter

    I taught art in a Muslim school for a year and what I loved most was the sense of all-pervading prayerfulness. We entered into a building where prayerful music was playing in the morning and we began and ended each lesson with prayer. Of course some of the students were rattling the prayers off in a parrot like way, but many were sincere. The ethos was very unifying and inspiring.


    Knowing how Muslim children can be picked on if they are in a minority, I am sure that the religious ethos was benefitting to teaching and learning. There were elements of management style which caused some teachers stress - plus an overall shortage of funds which meant we weren't paid as well as mainstream teachers, but that;'s not directly related to the religious ethos.

    When our children are young I think most parents are looking for a school where they will be safe, happy and nurtured in a way which respects our beliefs and what we consider to be important. So I am fully in sympathy with the concept of faith schools. However I do think that they will benefit from having a wider intake of student and a fairly broad curriculum. In our school I don't think the different (non-Muslim) religions were taught at all - and if they had been I feel that they would not have been taught in an impartial way.
     

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