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Does a child's ethnicity affect their performance in school?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by Jenny97, May 4, 2011.

  1. Hello
    We are a group of students who are investigating the question "does a child's ethnicity affect their performance in school?"
    We would like to know if you have any experiences or opinions on this matter.
    Thank you for any help you can offer
    [​IMG]

     
  2. Hello
    We are a group of students who are investigating the question "does a child's ethnicity affect their performance in school?"
    We would like to know if you have any experiences or opinions on this matter.
    Thank you for any help you can offer
    [​IMG]

     
  3. I don't know of any scientific research that suggests this. It is the fashion in SLT / LA / OFSTED to focus on "groups": EAL, FSM, Ethnic MInority, LAC, etc..........In reality do we treat these children any differently? In my view it would be appalling if we did. Surely, to put it crudely, we just teach what is put in front of us.
     
  4. Leapyearbaby64

    Leapyearbaby64 New commenter

    Off the top of my head, and being very simplistic, my list for things affecting performance in school are (a) intelligence (b) attitude and (c) parental support. Anecdotally, I don't have any evidence that ethnicity affects performance in school. At a classroom level, there are too many other variables to be thinking about.
     
  5. Hi there,
    I teach at an International School in London thus we have students from all over the world. Every two weeks the Maths co-ordinator sets a challenge for the children to complete which is optional. The children then receive a certificate and a pencil for completing the challenge.interestingly in KS2 the children who are often at the front receiving the certificate are boys and Asian and more specifically Japanese. The Japanese certainly have the strong desire to be successful which is encouraged in their culture.
     
  6. But that is more do with their social conditioning and their value of education, not their ethnicity.

     
  7. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    Exactly - we all know the stereotype of the hardworking Asian children whose parents value education and who work really well in school and behave impeccably, the black boy from inner city London with no male role models so he'll probably end up in a gang, the poor white working class child whose parents are on benefits and couldn't care about school and the white middle class child whose parents fight for their child in any way they can to ensure they get into the best school.
    Ethnicity? Expectations? Cultural background? Upbringing? Parenting skills?
     
  8. littlerussell

    littlerussell New commenter

    https://www.education.gov.uk/publications/eOrderingDownload/DCSF-RTP-09-02.pdf
    The graph in 2.8 shows attainment at both KS2 and GCSE for pupils of different ethnic groups.
    What is interesting is - as other posters suggest - that the ethnic groups with high levels of FSM (red) are more likely to achieve low levels than those with less FSM. It does, therefore, become very difficult to separate the effect of ethnicity from deprivation.


     
  9. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    Yes - the key issue is what we used to call 'social class', NOT ethnicity.
     
  10. nick909

    nick909 Star commenter

    Indeed, it seems bizarre that there is such a focus on ethnicity, where it's quite clearly the socio-economic factors in an area/within a family/a household that will influence attitudes towards education, regardless of which ethnic group is predominant in that area

    A very interesting point and one I'd never really thought of before. I agree entirely.
     

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