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Do you still take as much work home as you did when teaching full time?

Discussion in 'Headteachers' started by cleggy1611, Jan 30, 2012.

  1. cleggy1611

    cleggy1611 New commenter

    Just wondering really. I know headship is a completely different job and was wondering what kind of things replaces marking and planning...
    Thanks
    Cleggy
     
  2. anon2799

    anon2799 New commenter

    Reports for various committees, the school improvement review for the la, action plans, the sef - even though Gove said it was going, detailed data analysis in case someone queries why little jimmy hasn't made 3 sub levels this year and what you're doing about it, budget monitoring reports and spreadsheets, projections, bids for funding, endless government census returns and questionnaires, performance management reports, minutes of meetings, agendas for meetings, referrals, cp reports and reviews, policy writing, risk assessments , audits .... They're just a few I could think of that I've brought home in the last couple of weeks. At report time there are hundreds to read and comment on rather than 30. Of course many primary heads teach too so there's planning, preparation, marking and assessment.
     
  3. cleggy1611

    cleggy1611 New commenter

    Thanks for that reply! Without meaning to sound cheeky, what things do you manage to get done in school hours?
     
  4. anon2799

    anon2799 New commenter

    All of the above might get started but in school you're busy being a visible presence, dealing with issues with parents,, meeting various people (social workers, police, ed psychs, school improvement partners, community members, parents, people who you're working on projects with, builders, businesses, children's centre workers etc.) meeting with and supporting teachers, doing duties, assemblies, running clubs and committees with the kids, meeting with governors about various issues, dealing with any incidents, teaching, runnin open mornings, training, running workshops for parents, attending meetings with the LA or representatives, going to case conferences, going to cabinet if there's a motion being passed which will affect your school, getting out into the community where it's needed, promoting the school, answering the phones when the secretary is sick, unblocking the drains if the caretaker is off, fixing the boiler. Oh yeah, a spot of teaching too.
    The thing with headship is, you can go on with a clear diary, with every intention of getting top side of the paperwork and something can happen at 7.30 am that you're still dealing with at 6pm. The paperwork hasn't been touched so you bring it home with you.
     
  5. cleggy1611

    cleggy1611 New commenter

    Thanks. I really appreciate your reply. I have recently finished NPQH and really thought that I wanted to be a HT but now I am close to it I don't know whether I want it anymore.
     
  6. anon2799

    anon2799 New commenter

    You're never bored, that's for sure!
     
  7. Whatever you do you need to have some balance in your life. I try to protect some family time each day and some time to wind down. It is harder during weeks with late meetings but worth planning ahead for the odd early starts/ leave by 4.00 to get weekends away etc. You must keep a clear head to be able to cope. It is very different to teaching. There is always more to do and you'll get there in time and meet deadlines in your own way. You have to have a life too or else why do it.
     
  8. R13

    R13 New commenter

    The teachers at my school are typically great and work really hard with long hours . . . . . I work notably longer hours than any of them and feel the weight of responsibility pretty much all the time when I'm 'not working' too
     
  9. Well, you are in charge but it isn't all your responsibility. It isn't good for you to never switch off. You'll be better equipped to lead your school if you find ways to leave work mentally and physically on a regular basis.
     
  10. cleggy1611

    cleggy1611 New commenter

    My ht leaves at 3.45 every day apart from staff meeting nights. I don't ask what work he does at home because I think it would be inappropriate to do so and it's none of my business. The school seems to run perfectly well.
     
  11. That is minimal headteachering! Unless they start work at daybreak? I'd be wondering if he/she has their finger on the pulse with keeping an eye on everything and developing a vision/ constantly challenging oneself to improve etc.
     
  12. cleggy1611

    cleggy1611 New commenter

    Oh and he doesn't do break duty or after school clubs but asks that everyone else does a club.
     
  13. R13

    R13 New commenter

    I know someone who's apparently healthy and has smoked for 50 years . . . I still think it very, very unlikely that if I tried the same I'd have the same result.

    Most heads work very hard - the fact that some do not changes nothing
     
  14. anon2799

    anon2799 New commenter


    Totally agree.
    I was deputy for 2 very different heads - one could delegate for England - he walked out of the door at 3.45 every day and never ever took work home. His staff were extremely hard working and utterly miserable. I left.
    I went to deputise for a fantastic head who empathised, worked hard, played hard and trusted staff but was by no means a pushover. Her staff were extremely hard working and very happy. The only reason I left was because I was ready to take the role on myself.
    I know which sort of head I'd rather be.
    I agree that a work life balance is important. I work very hard, and I also play very hard. I've always been the sort of person who thrives on doing loads at once and my social life is just as busy and hectic as my work life.
    I make a point of only doing a few days in the holidays. Holiday time is family time. It's also extremely rare for me to worry about school issues once I've finished working. Work never keeps me awake at night, I'm too shattered!
     
  15. I am in the by 8, 3 days out of 5 because I give 2 LSA's a lift in (we are in the middle of nowhere) the other days I try to be at my desk by about 7. I never leave before 4 (only then because I have to walk the dog|) and I always have work to take home with me. I feel it is important to show willing to do the yukky jobs like drains and things (we have no caretaker!). I trust my staff and let them get on with their jobs unhindered - thats not the same as ignoring all issues! I go on the school camp, do weekend activities, get involved in fundraising and I teach.
    In the evenings there are jobs I like to do with a Gin and Tonic and a crafty fag (don't tell the kids!) like agendas, minutes, correspondence and some parent phone calls. I also do the figures and analysis as well as identifying training opportunities.
    Policies etc are also homework because the day is spent working with the students and staff, teaching, motivating and being involved in various agency/professionals meetings. I also make coffee and tea.
    I love my job, even if it is sometimes grim and stressful. It's only when you write it down that it starts to looks so monumental. As you grow into the role you find the stress recedes a certain amount and a good sense of gallows humour is helpful. I excercise and talk long dog walks without my mobile to unwind...and sometimes have a 2nd gin.
    Its my first headship and I was very scared but actually its wonderful.
     
  16. bnm

    bnm

    In answer to the original question: no.
    As a teacher I tried always to do my work at school but usually did 3 hours on a Saturday morning.
    As a head I usually (reports season excepted) do my work at school and don't need to work on Saturdays. I enjoy the freedom I have over my own diary (can go to the loo usually when I want) BUT I carry a whole load more stress.
    As a head I have taken anti-depressants and have had counselling, both directly related to work. As a teacher I never needed either.
    I have been in headship for over 10 years and love it. I work fewer hours than as a teacher. I am more stressed.
    It's a balance.
    Only you know which you prefer.

     
  17. Nice one.
    If you're an eager head who feels they must be the last one to leave, how do you cope if you have a teacher that stays until 8.30pm every night?
    Indeed also one who arrives at 7am every day? (for my sins I start at 7.10am every day to beat the traffic, doesn't stop the 8.15 arriving senior staff looking askance at me if I leave at 4.30).
     
  18. anon2799

    anon2799 New commenter

    I've never understood that mentality, as long as the job gets done I don't care if staff arrive at 8.30 and leave at 3.45 as they're contractually obliged to. Some people work better from home. Sometimes they have to stay later as the job can only be done in school. I don't agree with the culture of staying in school for the sake of it. On a Friday, once I've backed up the server, you won't see me for dust. POETS, I encourage everyone in our school to do the same.
     

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