1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Do you need to love teaching?

Discussion in 'Secondary' started by fluffysheep22, Sep 2, 2011.

  1. Hi,
    I'm an NQT who did the Teach First programme so I was employed by my school (quite a challenging one) last year as an unqualified teacher on an NQT timetable.
    What I'm really after is just some ideas and opinions really.
    I love my school, colleagues, pupils - everything! But I'm not sure I love teaching itself - the actual act of being the classroom leader, standing at the board etc etc. Do you think you can grow to love it or does it need to be love at first sight so to speak?
    If teaching isn't for me, what jobs could I do in schools that would give me the same interaction with pupils and colleagues?

    Thanks :)
     
  2. Hi,
    I'm an NQT who did the Teach First programme so I was employed by my school (quite a challenging one) last year as an unqualified teacher on an NQT timetable.
    What I'm really after is just some ideas and opinions really.
    I love my school, colleagues, pupils - everything! But I'm not sure I love teaching itself - the actual act of being the classroom leader, standing at the board etc etc. Do you think you can grow to love it or does it need to be love at first sight so to speak?
    If teaching isn't for me, what jobs could I do in schools that would give me the same interaction with pupils and colleagues?

    Thanks :)
     
  3. I stumbled into teaching accidentally, long story, but it was a spur of the moment phone call and then a series of little bits of serendipity. I had no love of teaching, and spent the first couple of years planning on what to do later...
    Now, eleven years on, I do love teaching. I don't love my colleagues, find aspects of the paper trail frustrating, can't abide the interference from on high, but... get me in the classroom, with my subject and any class, even a stroppy-git set, and I love it. Can't imagine doing anything else, nor would I want to.
    So yes, you can learn to love it, for all its frustrations. Good luck, and I hope you do.
     
  4. Thanks for sharing that - gives me hope!

    How did you grow to love it or was it quite organic over time?
    Things I love about job: interacting with pupils, even the ****** ones!! Things I hate: feeling stressed, under pressure, never feeling good enough and behaviour issues and excess work load.
     
  5. BillyBobJoe

    BillyBobJoe Established commenter

    If anything, loving teaching doesn't help. I love teaching, what I didn't like were dealing with students who didn't want to learn. If you can deal with that, not loving the actual teaching is pretty small potatoes.
     
  6. It must have crept up on me, so that one day instead of telling someone I was looking to do an MA/phd go off and be an academic somewhere, or travel the world, instead I extolled teaching as the best job going. Surprised myself.
    I think at some point I learnt to have the confidence not to feel I had to do things the way I was "supposed" to, and that when some scrote kicked off, it had nothing to do with me as a person, but was all about her problem with authority.
    The never feeling good enough thing is corrosive, I think that's the one every teacher feels, and is most damaging to enthusiasm, and ultimately to people leaving or becoming disillusioned. It's hard to learn to say I've done my best in the constraints of having a life, which is the reality of teaching - there's always more you could do, theoretically.
    Practice that shrug, follow your instincts, and enjoy it!
     
  7. bigpedro

    bigpedro New commenter

    I fall in and out of love with the job regularly. But as discussed above, the good bits outweigh the bad. (at the risk of trumpet blowing...) Just this afternoon I was served in the Post Office by a girl I had taught for one rotation (12 weeks) in Y9 about 5 years ago in another school and she remembered me, the subject, and... I quote "yours was the sort of lessson you remember after you leave school" That sort of thing's happened a couple of times now (starting my 8th year in teaching)
    Its those moments that make you feel its all worthwhile. Stick with it...

    p.s.
    If you want a school job that gives you everything without the **** take a look at becoming a CSA or technician (if its science/technology e.t.c.)
     

Share This Page