1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded education professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Do we give pupils too much grief?

Discussion in 'Education news' started by MrHarker, Jan 29, 2020.

  1. MrHarker

    MrHarker New commenter

    In the news this morning: https://blog.edlounge.com/behaviour...than-punish-pupils-according-to-new-research/

    The article says that there is a strong link between giving pupils praise and how focused they are in class (it's not that surprising when you think about it), but I wondered if we need to change our approach to praise and discipline?

    What tips would you give to someone with a disruptive pupil to try and get the best out of them? Has anyone changed their approach to teaching today on the back of what they've read this morning?
     
  2. phlogiston

    phlogiston Star commenter

    Old news really. Part of my practice for decades.
    The linked article suggests that 80% of youngsters respond positively to praise. That means 20% don't. They're the ones who give the headaches, who need different strategies. There's a fair subset of that group that also don't respond to punishments. They're the ones I don't miss!
    .
     
  3. bessiesmith2

    bessiesmith2 New commenter

    While most teachers would agree that praise is a very useful tool - and some of us, perhaps including me, could make more use of it, it's not quite so straightforward as the article suggests. For example, it's not clear from the way the research is presented in the article whether the relationship between praise and behaviour was cause or correlation. Might it not be the case that well-behaved students tend to receive more praise?

    And while much of the article actually does make good sense, I am puzzled by the idea suggested at the end that if a child appears to be disrupting the class in order to avoid work they should be able to earn a 'get out of homework' pass. Many questions spring to mind - Is the homework worth doing? Can any of the less disruptive students earn such a pass? What message are you hoping the child will get from this tactic?
     
  4. install

    install Star commenter

    It's an American study. So not very relevant here imho. Different country, different culture, different approach.
     
    agathamorse and Jamvic like this.
  5. Jamvic

    Jamvic Star commenter

    We mostly all respond to praise and positive encouragement over criticism and indifference, It’s just human nature. The skill lies in knowing how much praise, what to give praise for and if that praise is justified. No one spots fake, overdone, overused, adult praise like a teenager.
     
    agathamorse and Lalad like this.
  6. moscowbore

    moscowbore Lead commenter

    Praise is powerful. The biggest, toughest, most-disillusioned and reluctant learners will smile when they receive honest praise.
    This is difficult if we are presenting those same learners with spreadsheets every half-term which have red boxes next to their name saying they are under-achieving, not on their flight path and need extra intervention lessons to achieve their targets.
     
  7. Lalad

    Lalad Star commenter

    But also:

    "Praise is powerful. The biggest, toughest, most-disillusioned and reluctant teachers will smile when they receive honest praise.
    This is difficult if we are presenting those same teachers with spreadsheets every half-term which have red boxes next to their name saying they are under-achieving, not on their flight path and need extra support to achieve their targets."

    It starts at the top
    o_O
     
  8. moscowbore

    moscowbore Lead commenter

    Spot on!
     
    Jamvic and agathamorse like this.

Share This Page