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do R eading recovery children go backwards when they stop having the 1-1 sessions?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by breadmaker, Feb 8, 2011.

  1. breadmaker

    breadmaker New commenter

    Just wondered if anyone knows of any research or has direct experience of this? Our school has been doing RR programme and when the children get to a certain level, they return to class. Of the children who have returned across our 4 form entry year group, most of them are not only not making progress, but they seem to be very reluctant to do the reading themselves wihtout loads of adult support. Obviously, they have become used to having 1-1 time each day for anything upto 1 hour, but I just wondered, should we expect them to be able to read independently once they have stopped going to RR or is the idea just for them to catch up with their peers? Thanks for any replies.
     
  2. breadmaker

    breadmaker New commenter

    Just wondered if anyone knows of any research or has direct experience of this? Our school has been doing RR programme and when the children get to a certain level, they return to class. Of the children who have returned across our 4 form entry year group, most of them are not only not making progress, but they seem to be very reluctant to do the reading themselves wihtout loads of adult support. Obviously, they have become used to having 1-1 time each day for anything upto 1 hour, but I just wondered, should we expect them to be able to read independently once they have stopped going to RR or is the idea just for them to catch up with their peers? Thanks for any replies.
     
  3. If you go to http://readingrecovery.ioe.ac.uk/reportsResearch.html you will find the research. RR has been in our school for the last 4 years, all teachers/TAs are invited to observe a session and inset has been run explaining the programme to staff. I would query the 'up to an hour a day', each RR session should run for 30 minutes, sometimes it seems longer if you take into account getting to and from the classroom. If a child is in Year 1 they should discontinue RR sessions when they are level 16 (Band 6), before this the RR teacher should liaise with the class teacher and work with the child in class, but not 1:1 as part of a group. Independence should have been instilled and encouraged, in my experience most children are only too eager to demonstrate how able they are. Before leaving the programme assessments are carried out by another teacher who has been trained how to carry these out and not by the RR teacher so there can be no bias. Some children may need some support when RR is discontinued but it should certainly not be daily. Children who have left the programme are followed up at 3 and 6 month intervals and in our school are tracked after this. Nearly all the children who have been on the programme at our school were at dictational level before starting the programme so had very low literacy levels in Year 1, only 1 so far has had to be referred to an EP as specific learning difficulties became obvious. Hope this helps.
     
  4. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

  5. upsadaisy

    upsadaisy New commenter

    Don't you find that this is true of most intervention programmes?

    The children get very used to having 1:1 or small group support, but then find it very difficult to work independently. Often they then go onto the next year group and may do another intervention or be in the l.a. group which often receive support.

    They quite often don't address the root of the problem either.

    I also think that we do the children a disservice by passing them along each year even though they haven't achieved. I feel that often in either Reception or Year1 they should stay back and repeat the year.
     

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