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Do I Qualify?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by TinklePrincess, Mar 1, 2011.

  1. Hi everybody!

    I hope you don't mind me posting on this forum but no-one answered me on the Teaching Assistant forum.
    I am a university student who is a little confused about her future, so if you could help me, I'd very much appreciate it!

    I will be graduating with an Early Childhood Studies degree and hopefully EYPS (Early Years Professional Status) this year.
    I always assumed that I wanted to be a teacher, however, after not being successful in my PGCE application, I had the chance to re-evaluate my aspirations. I came to the conclusion that I would probably be better suited to being a teaching assistant right now as I will gain experience in actual schools, rather than nurseries, if I should ever want to re-apply for the PGCE. Also, it would allow me to start off with less responsibility, therefore allowing me to gain more confidence in myself as a quality practitioner.

    I was just wondering if I would be qualified enough to apply for Teaching Assistants positions, and if so, when would be the best time to do so? Or would I need to complete some further training or studies first?

    Many thanks for your time and any assistance you can offer :)
     
  2. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    Reception? Really?
     


  3. I wasn't claiming authority - but yes - Reception is EYFS not compulsory schooling for many children.



    Happy to be enlightened by someone who 'knows'
     
  4. invincible

    invincible New commenter

    But it is compulsory for some (those who turn 5 years of age in that time) and thus a Reception class needs a qualified teacher in it.
     
  5. invincible

    invincible New commenter

    In any case, it is a requirement of the EYFS that if a nursery is part of the maintained sector, a "school teacher" must be present.
     
  6. I have five years of experience in working within the foundation stage. Most of this was in nurseries but some was in reception classes. I think I probably need to gain more experience in the school setting in order to re-apply for the PGCE but like I said, at the minute I think I'd quite like to try a teaching assistant role.

    The EYPS is a graduate level qualification but I will already have a level 6 from my degree in the first place. I wasn't aware that I could be a nursery teacher with this qualification (to be honest, my university faculty aren't very well organised and are no help at all in careers advice!)
     
  7. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    I'm afraid not you still need QTS to teach "EYPS and QTS, are both professional statuses, but are based on a
    different set of skills and knowledge. It is important to note that
    EYPS and QTS are not interchangeable."

    Your degree is in Early Years so some schools might be reluctant to employ you in KS2 but I'm sure they would consider you in KS1 and certainly in reception.
     
  8. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    You can't in a maintained school
     
  9. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Children aged three and over in maintained schools and nursery schools (except for children in
    reception classes)

    The early years provision in each class or group of pupils must be led by a ‘school teacher’. (As defined by Section 122 of the Education Act 2002 and the Education (School Teachers’ Prescribed Qualifications, etc) Order 2003.)
    A teacher must be present with the children except during non-contact time, breaks and shortterm absence.
    Children in reception classes in maintained schools
    The EYFS does not place ratio and qualification requirements on reception classes in maintained schools provided they fall within the legal definition of an infant class (i.e. a class containing upils the majority of whom will reach the age of five, six, or seven during the course of the school year). Such classes are already subject to infant class size legislation: an infant class must not contain more than 30 pupils while an ordinary teaching session is conducted by a single school teacher
     
  10. Most of our TAs are parent helpers that apply for the jobs that come up. Some good, some bad, some with very little experience before hand. I would say you qualify easily for a TA position.
     

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