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Do I have to resign before looking for a new job?

Discussion in 'Jobseekers' started by skygoby, Feb 12, 2012.

  1. I haven't been looking on TES for long so I might not have searched properly but I didn't find an answer to this. Hopefully someone can help.
    I know the official deadlines for resignations each term. What I'm not sure about is whether I have to resign before properly looking for a new job.
    My friend working at another school told me I don't and that I can accept a job before resigning, but I can't see how this is logistically possible! Firstly, if I'm lucky enough to find any jobs to apply for, I would need time off for visits and hopefully interviews. That means I would have to tell my school, and based on my experience so far, they would be extremely reluctant to agree to cover my class for that time. I suppose from their point of view, they shouldn't have to. I'm on a permanent contract, I only started in January and I'm an NQT so they are in no way going to be happy and supportive about me looking to leave! (I have very good reasons to want to leave by the way, I haven't thought of this overnight). Secondly, references would be asked for, so even if I didn't need time off, my head would still find out before I could ever be offered a new position.
    So it seems to me that looking for a new job without telling your current school would be near impossible and the only way really is to resign first, so it's a huge risk!
     
  2. I haven't been looking on TES for long so I might not have searched properly but I didn't find an answer to this. Hopefully someone can help.
    I know the official deadlines for resignations each term. What I'm not sure about is whether I have to resign before properly looking for a new job.
    My friend working at another school told me I don't and that I can accept a job before resigning, but I can't see how this is logistically possible! Firstly, if I'm lucky enough to find any jobs to apply for, I would need time off for visits and hopefully interviews. That means I would have to tell my school, and based on my experience so far, they would be extremely reluctant to agree to cover my class for that time. I suppose from their point of view, they shouldn't have to. I'm on a permanent contract, I only started in January and I'm an NQT so they are in no way going to be happy and supportive about me looking to leave! (I have very good reasons to want to leave by the way, I haven't thought of this overnight). Secondly, references would be asked for, so even if I didn't need time off, my head would still find out before I could ever be offered a new position.
    So it seems to me that looking for a new job without telling your current school would be near impossible and the only way really is to resign first, so it's a huge risk!
     
  3. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    No, don't resign from a job until you have accepted a job offer in another school.
    Otherwise you will join the long, long line of unemployed teachers.
    They will cover for interviews, although they may not for visits. But what experience do you have of them not covering classes for you? Surely recognised absences (mainly unavoidable medical - not normal dentist - , but also funerals of immediate family members) are covered?
    For interviews, it is custom and practice to give reasonable time off. That means not the whole day if it is an hour's interview at 9.00 in a school 5 minutes away.
    You bet! After just half a term, and you on a permanent contract too! I'll add that the schools that you apply for will not be impressed either . . . you really need to think this through.
    Absolutely! The statutory guidance to schools is that references should be asked for before interview.
    Totally impossible. And an enormous risk.
    The moment that you apply for a job, you need to talk to the Head (or in a large school, your HoD) about it.
    But to be honest (and you won't like this, assuming that you have liked any of the above!), you are not in a good position for job hunting. You would not be very employable, I'm afraid.
    Any school that you apply for will be very curious, or even suspicious, about you wanting to leave that Magical Situation of actually having a permanent post, and able to do your induction year. There are thousands of unemployed NQTs out there who would KILL to be in your situation! But you are applying elsewhere after just half a term.
    And my guess is that if you explain your reason, from your unwillingness to talk to your current school, this is a reason that will not look good. So they'll probably think: "Can't take the pressure - and goes around moaning about the school! No thanks!"
    And if I'm wrong, and it's nothing to do with the school, they will still be unimpressed: "Personal problems and gives up after half a term! No thanks!"
    So your best bet, instead of thinking about applying elsewhere from a position of weakness, is to look about improving your situation in your current school, or in your life overall. Is there anyone that you could talk to, to get advice, or to get a different perspective that might make you feel better about the situation?
    You really need to finish your induction year successfully before starting to apply elsewhere. The ideal time to apply would be in 12 to 15 months, for a Sept 2013 start.
    Not the answer that you wanted to hear, I know. But this is my honest view of your situation.
    Best wishes
    _______________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    I do Application and Interview one-to-ones, and also contribute to the Job Application Seminars. We look at application letters, executive summaries and interviews, with practical exercises that people really appreciate.
    I shall be doing the Win That Teaching Job seminar on Saturday February 25th, and also the Moving into Headship or SLT seminar on Saturday 18th February
    www.tesweekendworkshop87.eventbrite.com
    www.tesweekendworkshop82.eventbrite.com
     
  4. Thank you for a very honest and thorough answer.
    I'm sure it sounds, as you have implied, that I am very ungrateful and probably the sort of person who would complain whatever position I'm in.
    This really isn't true. I do appreciate how hard it is to find an NQT position - it was the toughest process I've ever been through. Unfortunately I have had an absolutely awful first half term and feel depressed about going back, because of complete lack of support and the attitudes of people I work for, not because I'm not up to it.
    But nor have I definitely decided to quit and throw the job back in their faces. I'm very willing to push forward, at least until the end of my induction and probably until the end of next year. I just wanted to know for my peace of mind how the whole thing works and if it gets too bad, what options I have.
     
  5. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    Good for you!
    Try sitting down this week and writing out what support you need. Then e-mail it to your HoD and your mentor - two people. If Hod IS mentor, then to DHT. If you don't ask, you won't get! You may be giving the impression thaty ou are confident and doing well, so they are not aware of the issues.
    Best wishes
    _______________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    I do Application and Interview one-to-ones, and also contribute to the Job Application Seminars. We look at application letters, executive summaries and interviews, with practical exercises that people really appreciate.
    I shall be doing the Win That Teaching Job seminar on Saturday February 25th, and also the Moving into Headship or SLT seminar on Saturday 18th February
    www.tesweekendworkshop87.eventbrite.com
    www.tesweekendworkshop82.eventbrite.com
     
  6. Ozzie777

    Ozzie777 New commenter

    I have just read this thread and am now concerned. I put an application in last week for a role starting in September. I secured a permanent job in November (part time) converting to full time from the start of January. My NQT induction started at the beginning of January. My reasons for wanting to move on are two fold: 1. The chance to teach A-level (my current school is 11-16) and 2. Less travel (which is costing me about 10 percent of my gross salary).

    My current school is fine and I am reasonably happy there (although I have picked up a proxy HoD role, which has both positive and negative elements).

    Nothing may come of the application and I have agreed with the deputy head of the school with which I have lodged an application not to take up a reference with my existing school until they notify me that I am shortlisted. At this stage I have not said anything to my current school about my application.

    I am wondering in the light of what you have said above Theo, that perhaps I should withdraw my application rather than damage the relationship with my existing school and just bide my time.
     
  7. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    These are good reasons, very justifiable. This is no concern.
    This is good, too. You can (if shortlisted) speak to your current school, emphasising how pleased you are to be there, what excellent professional development you are getting, how you appreciate the chance to work with such supportive colleagues, etc etc. but feel that you must take this special chance to move nearer home and get the full 11-18 experience.
    The point is that your reasons are strong ones, and you can be positive to the current school about them and about your time at the school; this was not the case for the other poster.
    So I don't think that you need withdraw at this stage, but do think carefully about any other jobs that you apply for if this one is not successful. Biding your time might just be a good idea, especially as you are getting the HoD experience - and even the negative bits are positives in the end, because you deal with them and learn from that.
    Best wishes
    _______________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    I do Application and Interview one-to-ones, and also contribute to the Job Application Seminars. We look at application letters, executive summaries and interviews, with practical exercises that people really appreciate.
    I shall be doing the Win That Teaching Job seminar on Saturday February 25th, and also the Moving into Headship or SLT seminar on Saturday 18th February
    www.tesweekendworkshop87.eventbrite.com
    www.tesweekendworkshop82.eventbrite.com
     
  8. I do have strong reasons, I just don't feel it is appropriate to share them in detail here, especially as this area is for jobseekers.
    I will say simply that I feel I'm getting a rough deal from my induction compared to many other teachers I've spoken to. This is in terms of support and NQT and PPA time, which are both very sparse, and training. My school seems to have serious budget issues (not sure how this works) and say they can't afford training or cover for me at the moment.
    Teaching is something I've passionately wanted to do for years. I hoped that as long as I worked hard, my first year would be a positive and inspiring experience. Seems I was being silly and idealistic. I thought it would be about my development and understanding and providing the best I can for my class - not just getting the job done without hassling my overworked colleagues, as seems to be the reality. As we all know induction is a one-time thing. I feel that my professional development and building a positive, creative philosophy are at the very bottom of a long list of priorities at the school. Not only is this making me feel less and less enthusiastic about teaching every day, I'm worried that my development will ultimately be damaged (through lack of support and training) and I won't be at all attractive to future employers who will interview teachers who had much more fulfilling NQT years.

     
  9. anon8315

    anon8315 Established commenter

    A girl I worked with started in september as an NQT, resigned by the October half term deadline and left at Christmas with a job to go to.
    I've only been in my post since September and have a new one to go to at Easter. It just wasn't for me! x
     
  10. Hi Theo et al.,
    I thought I'd post here as my position is somewhat similar. I started my NQT induction in January, having qualified in July. I've survived my first half term, although it's been a struggle, partly because I've been thrown into year 6 half way through the year in a school which is under Ofsted pressure to do well in the SATs.
    My reasons for jobseeking are:
    1. I only have a fixed term contract for two terms.
    2. The school runs a VERY narrow curriculum as a result of a spell in special measures and poor SATs results. I love teaching PE and feel frustrated that it has been sacrificed in Year 6 in favour of teaching to test in preparation for the SATs. I have made zero fuss over this as I can understand the concerns of SMT, but it is a huge shame and the structure of the school day creates a lot of extra work for the teachers.
    3. Having been in good schools in the South West for training, I've had a culture shock with behaviour in my London school. I'm working on it, but I'd love to spend more time teaching and less time firefighting. I'm particularly looking to move to a prep school, where sport and excellent behaviour will hopefully be more engrained in the culture of the school.
    I know I'm very lucky to have an NQT post, and the SMT at my school have shown great faith in me by putting me in Year 6. The reason it's a fixed term contract is because the previous incumbent was a loose cannon and they wanted to avoid the possibility of another battle to remove a bad egg. That means that there is a job, although I'd prefer to be further down the school next year and the SMT know this.
    I'd be willing to stay, and if they offered to make my contract permanent tomorrow I'd say "yes". However, I don't want to wait around and miss out on great opportunities, only to be told that they won't be extending my contract - leaving me high and dry in July.
    Questions for Theo then!
    1. What would indy Heads think if they received an application from me, 7 weeks into my first post (albeit fixed term)?
    2. Would my current Head think I was holding her to ransom if I went in seeking assurances, a full 5 months before the end of my contract?

     

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