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Do i go on at the children too much? self improv.

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by CharChar88, Sep 15, 2011.

  1. I try to be firm but fair with the children so make them all join in tidying up, sitting on the carpet in calm, being attentive as required and not talking when the teacher is etc etc.

    But I feel that I'm constantly going on at 3/4 of them in particular.
    They are only reception but enforcing expectations is key right? And these few are known for monkeying around excessively.

    Sometimes i think that I should just back off a bit but then that's causing inconsistency within class expectations.

    Should I just keep going at it? I worry that maybe I'm expecting too much and being a grumpy battleaxe but.....they're talking loud, standing up, not tidying of their own will if you see my meaning.

    Any tips to boost me and my methods?
     
  2. I try to be firm but fair with the children so make them all join in tidying up, sitting on the carpet in calm, being attentive as required and not talking when the teacher is etc etc.

    But I feel that I'm constantly going on at 3/4 of them in particular.
    They are only reception but enforcing expectations is key right? And these few are known for monkeying around excessively.

    Sometimes i think that I should just back off a bit but then that's causing inconsistency within class expectations.

    Should I just keep going at it? I worry that maybe I'm expecting too much and being a grumpy battleaxe but.....they're talking loud, standing up, not tidying of their own will if you see my meaning.

    Any tips to boost me and my methods?
     
  3. spectra75

    spectra75 New commenter


    yes i think its a bit too much. they r only 4-5 year olds and not all will be following instructions. how about reward system?
     
  4. teacherof30

    teacherof30 New commenter

    You and I are having the same battle then. I'm taking it as early days, constantly reinforcing the good behaviours, praising other children who are doing the right thing and *trying* to ignore some of the stuff the disruptive ones are doing - it gets harder at the end of the day!

    I'd say stick at it. Consistency is the key. If the other 26 are doing it, why shouldn't these children. I do agree with the other poster about rewards, but I don't think you are expecting too much of these children to toe the line.

    Today I've involved the other children and they have been heard talking to children not helping tidy up / rolling on the carpet etc and modelling how they should behave. I've really praised them when they've done it which had an effect... I hope!

    Baby steps and all that!
     
  5. At tidy up time give these children specific jobs to do eg put all the bricks in the box, and keep sending them back if they walk away before finished, then praise them up when they finish. Any disruptive behaviour on the carpet, have consequences that work in stages eg 1 reminder, 1 warning, time out with a 3 minute sand timer, send to another classroom. Have simple rules and explain them and refer to them frequently. Explain the behaviour consequences before starting to use them, then use them consistently. These are young children but that doesn't mean they should be allowed to get away with bad behaviour. However they do need to know and be clear about the expectations and what will happen if they break the rules. You will be able to tell if children really cannot understand and respond to this, they will be children with clear special needs who need something more.Alongside the rules and consequences praise children who behave well lavishly and reward them. Say you are proud of them and that their parents will be proud, say you can trust them, that they are stars, and be sure to tell them exactly why so that the others get the message.You may feel that you are going on at them all the time because you are nagging without following through, and having a bit of a moan. Instead of doing that build up your response staying calm throughout by simply referring to the rules and consequences.I hope this helps. Good luck.
     
  6. cariad2

    cariad2 New commenter


    I'd say definitely keep going at it. Otherwise it's not fair on those children who do conform. Also, if those children think they can get away with things now, it's going to be harder whenever you do decide to get the behaviour sorted.
    They may only be 4, but toddlers can be trained to tidy up after themselves, so there's no reason why reception children shouldn't be doing it. At the moment I'm being very lavish with praise, trying to loudly praise each child several times in a session for doing good tidying, sharing nicely, putting their hand up rather than calling out etc
    Quite often hearing others praised is enough to make others conform eg if somebody isn't sitting with their legs crossed on the carpet, my first tactic is to praise a child next to them who is sitting nicely. Usually that is all I need to do, but if that doesn't work I will use the child's name and remind them what they should be doing. (starting with a nice gentle voice, but using my firm voice if that still doesn't work)
    With tidying up, I start by just getting children's attention, and then telling them that we need to tidy up. I've got some lovely helpful children, who will then get on with it straight away. If others are milling around, I look for an area that is still untidy and ask who would be very kind and tidy up such and such. A few more will then rush over to that area. The final few children who are still playing or just wandering around are then given specific tasks eg "So and so is tidying up the bricks all by himself. Can you go and help him."
    Tidying up at the end of a session is going really well so far. The bit that I'm really having to work on at the moment, is getting children to tidy up as they go along so that we don't have a bomb site at the end of a session.
    I am only using praise as a reward. I'm probably a grumpy old cow, but I don't really see why children need stars and stickers for doing what they should be doing anyway. I don't have a problem with them if a child has been particularly kind or brave, or produced an exceptional (for them) piece of work.
    But why does everybody these days (at home as well as schools, nurseries etc) think children need a concrete reward for just getting on and doing what they are supposed to.
     

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