1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Do I Go Back To Work Full Time?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by Stamp73, Mar 7, 2011.

  1. Please advise. I am a primary (later years) teacher of 10 years, who has had off nearly two years caring for my second baby. My first child is now in reception. I want to return to work and set about looking for a point 0.4 up to 0.6 position, but there just arn't any part time vacancies! All the governmental cuts I presume.
    Now 2 vacancies have come up in the Junior (seperate) school of the infants school that my first child attends. If I were to teach there, I wouldn't have any childcare issues - I hated playcentre and am firmly resolved not to send my own children there. I would have a job, ie much needed income, the school is literally 3 streets away (walking) and of course we would share the holidays.
    BUT, it is full time. My second child isn't even two. My values for my first child were to only work a maximum of three days so that they were spending more time with me than in an institution. What do other parents do? Especially if a child is ill. My health with the stress of teaching was never 100% either. And what do I do? Apply for local part-time or hold out for elusive part-time and put child into after school care a few days a week? Thanks for any advice. K
     
  2. Please advise. I am a primary (later years) teacher of 10 years, who has had off nearly two years caring for my second baby. My first child is now in reception. I want to return to work and set about looking for a point 0.4 up to 0.6 position, but there just arn't any part time vacancies! All the governmental cuts I presume.
    Now 2 vacancies have come up in the Junior (seperate) school of the infants school that my first child attends. If I were to teach there, I wouldn't have any childcare issues - I hated playcentre and am firmly resolved not to send my own children there. I would have a job, ie much needed income, the school is literally 3 streets away (walking) and of course we would share the holidays.
    BUT, it is full time. My second child isn't even two. My values for my first child were to only work a maximum of three days so that they were spending more time with me than in an institution. What do other parents do? Especially if a child is ill. My health with the stress of teaching was never 100% either. And what do I do? Apply for local part-time or hold out for elusive part-time and put child into after school care a few days a week? Thanks for any advice. K
     
  3. marlin

    marlin Star commenter Forum guide

    I returned to work full time when my children were a similar age. It was very tough - and this was more than 20 years ago when teaching was a very different job to what it is now. I thoroughly enjoyed being in the classroom and the money was a necessary addition to the family 'pot'. Like you I wanted part time, but that wasn't available.
    The youngest was placed with a child minder come private nursery and the eldest was just starting school. My biggest problem was what to do when one of the children was ill. The childminder wouldn't take the youngest if had the slightest sniffle or anything she decided she wasn't happy about - in case the others caught it. I was living on a knife edge worrying about whether she would take him or not! I was lucky in that my OH could take time off to help out - but this wasn't always an option. The extended family all lived in another part of the country, so help at short notice wasn't available. M-i-L would come whenever she could to help out. In the end we opted for a daily nanny - it just made life so much easier. It wasn't the cheapest option and I had to get to grips with dealing with her tax etc. Once the youngest started school we found a lovely child minder who looked after both children after school. After this it all became much easier so there is light at the end of the tunnel!
    Only you know if you are strong enough health wise to cope with the demands of full time work and looking after the home. It does sound as if you have some doubts. Consider your support network very carefully - you will need it.
    Good luck with whatever you decide to do.
     
  4. Thanks Marlin. Your advice was much appreciated and has given me a lot to think about.. K
     
  5. I think you know the answer. I believe tha, from the way your question is phrased, you are trying to convince yourself that working f-t would be okay but in your heart you really don't want to.
    For what it is worth I hung out for that elusive p-t job and had to accept that I did lots of short term contracts - lots of the 0.4 jobs were covering a maternity leave for some-one having their second child - and spells of supply. It wasn't professionally ideal but I look back at my children's childhoods and know that I was there more often than I wasn't. It was easier to box and cox illness with my OH as he organised anylong distance travel on the days that I was working knowing that I would cover any illness but accepted that on my working days he would be the one to take time off/work from home.
    If your eldest is at the attached infant school you will still need childcare - small children aren't best pleased at having to hang about while Mummy fiddles with a display, photocopies etc They will do it for the odd day but not every evening and what about staff meeting days?
    Think long and hard. I struggle to work f-t with my 3 children aged between 12 and 16, I constantly feel that I am doing neither thing properly. Make sure that you will beable to look yourself in the eye in the bathroom mirror and be happy with the choices that you have made.
    Good Luck
     
  6. marymoocow

    marymoocow Star commenter

    If you are not desperate for the money then take your time. Your health and your initial wishes for your children are important, listen to your gut feeling it is usually right. That said many of the disadvantages are outwayed by the proximity to home and your own children going to the same school. Have you considered a childminder as they are more likely to get a home from home experience. I did small amounts of supply when my youngest was 18 months ie approx once a month, gradually moving to once a week. I was lucky to have family willing to babysit occassionally and a friend who was a childminder who would do planned supply cover. This led to a couple of part time contracts that made me virtually fulltime for a year when my youngest was 5. It was at schools within 15 mins of home and I used a combination of child minder and an afterschool club which I wasnt happy with but had no other choice. I found it very hard with my youngest who hated me working so much. I was lucky to get a 0.5 perm contract and have been very happy since. PT posts dont come around very often and can depend on where you live in the country, then there can be a glut of them like buses. More rural areas tend to have more PT contracts due to the number of small schools. You could consider getting a fulltime job and later requesting a job share.
     

Share This Page