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Do Art Teachers need to have an Art Related degree?

Discussion in 'Art and design' started by raymondo84, Dec 14, 2011.

  1. Hi There,
    This might seem an obvious issue or completely stupid but i'm going to throw it out there anyway as I'm interested to find out if there are others in my situation who are now teaching Art. My question is are there any teachers out there who are teaching art and design who do not have a relevant degree or qualification? And if so how did you manage to begin teaching the subject?
    I graduated University with a a degree in History knowing immediately that i'd made a mistake in not choosing to follow my heart and pursue my interests in Fine Art at degree level. I'm now also interested in teaching and know that i'd be able to offer more passion and enthusiasm through the teaching of Art than I would for History. I've always managed to maintain a creative outlet in one form or another and I feel that i'd be able to help others to express themselves and to become creative themselves, whilst also respecting and taking an interest in the work of others.
    Obviously my first step is to gain more experience in teaching environments but I am interested to find out if there are others who have found themselves in a similar situation and to find out if they have succeeded. I have spoken with a number of people on the TDA helpline who have offered up different advise, some suggesting that i'd need a vocational degree that was related to some aspect of Art or Design, which would involve me returning to studies for a further 5 years if you take into account a foundation course and a teaching qualification, whilst others have suggested that I contact the institutions that offer PGCE's in Art and Design to see if they would take me.
    If anyone can help with any advise it would be greatly appreciated and much needed!


     
  2. It's probably different in England and Wales but in Scotland you definitely can NOT teach art without a relevant degree. How do you expect to teach a subject you don't have an in depth knowledge of, if you don't mind me asking? At the risk of offending you, if I were a parent of a child being taught a specialist subject by someone with no thorough experience/qualifications/skills in, I'd be *very* concerned.
     
  3. joli2

    joli2 New commenter

    I'd say no, it won't be possible without an art degree, or rather it shouldn't be possible. You might find an ITT place, but when applying for jobs you'd be very disadvantaged, especially considering there is no shortage of art teachers. I would certainly never appoint someone without a relevant degree. Why would anyone when there's usually a good field to choose from?
    My neice is studying for her art degree through an Open University type programme. It will take her a good few years, but means she can work throughout. Is this a possibilty for you?
     
  4. I agree with what you are saying. Even though I have worked as a commercial artist for some time now and have hands-on experience in the professional field. I believe in the foundations that a formal degree can offer, which is why I asked the question. The Open University is an option that I am considering I was just wondering if there were any other alternatives out there that would see me enter the profession swiftly.
     
  5. You omitted that in your OP..! By commercial artist, what do you mean, specifically? (curious) I mean, I know what 'commercial artist' means, but it's a broad term, generally.
     
  6. I'm going to be candid here. I went to art college, I have a BA(Hons) and did my PGDE as an Art and Design specialist. I'm also a 'professional' painter and illustrator of many years (about fifteen) I STILL feel insecure in my abilities teaching certain art areas. I just think that someone who doesn't have the basic grounding in art would struggle to teach it and would find it all a bit overwhelming. A swift entry (if such an opportunity exists) into a course you're not really qualified for would be disastrous for you, in my honest opinion. Sorry. Saying that, I'm sure someone will be along soon to tell you to go for it, so you can feel free to disregard my opinion.
     
  7. No I really appreciate the honesty and its why I made the post in the first place. Although I have worked as a printmaker for sometime now (profession and techniques passed down from family business) I do feel I am missing the basic foundations to teach something I am truely passionate about, which worries me greatly!
    Teaching is my desired profession going forward, having carried out some work experience over the last few years I know I could achieve great things but I'd only want to do it if I could give my very best in a given subject. I know I can offer my passion and enthusiasm for the subject but I may be lacking in my technical abilities which is obviously a huge flaw that could work against me. It is a shame as I am keen to enter the profession, I could teach history but I remember what it was like to have teachers who were not passionate about their subject matter and I truely do not want to become one of them.
    It's a shame I was badly advised when I was younger and was not made aware of the implications such a choice would have but never mind
    Back to Uni it may be then!
     
  8. Lottes

    Lottes New commenter

    I <u>would</u> say 'go for it',..... but I very much agree with joli2 here, and also about the need for degree specialists at secondary level.
    However... having just done a quick TES job search, there are 4 History of Art posts up this week! You could try and get onto an Art ITT course (though you may struggle with this even) but promote yourself as a GCSE/ A'Level History of Art specialist with KS3 practical capabilities? Schools often like a second subject, so you could also offer some KS3 History, maybe more? Contact a couple of courses and ask?
     
  9. My friend, a life-long bagpipe player(!) had an instructor job at a well known Scottish private school - he had no music teaching experience and hadn't studied at college or university, but obviously he knew his stuff when it came to bagpipes. Could you perhaps write to schools offering specialist printmaking classes, and meantime do an art history course via OU, in the evenings? Just a thought. Private schools have money for stuff like this, and they're not beholden to the curriculum like state/council schools.
     
  10. I sympathize with your situation, however i agree with the majority of posts here. As an art teacher myself, I am very aware of the fierce competition for jobs after PGCE. A non art related degree candidate may not be looked upon positively. One thing to bare in mind . A common misconception of Art Teaching in secondary schools is that its about being creative and expressing oneself. There are specific skills and understanding that need to be learnt and applied,the whole teaching process can be very structured and not all students love the subject. If you have a career making art professionally, I'd research the role of an art teacher further before making any big decisions. Good luck .
     
  11. Hi there,
    I have a degree in Illustration and minor in Art History an I applied for a PGCE last year and wasn't successful, however I had another interview Monday for the same university and same Art and Design PGCE and I was told yesterday I got on :)... There was only 7 places at my chosen University for the Art PGCE.. Manchester Met have 16 places, Edge Hill have 9 and Anglia Ruskin have 3.. The places have dropped considerably.

    Its going to be EXTREMELY near impossible for the Uni to accept you on an Art PGCE when there are literally hundreds of people with Art Degrees going for the course. I would suggest maybe doing a foundation year at Uni and then applying, you would then have a degree and a foundation Art degree...
     
  12. joli2

    joli2 New commenter

    A foundation year won't give you a 'foundation art degree'. You will need a full degree in an art subject.
     
  13. A foundation Degree would be an enhancement as you already have an undergraduate Degree. SO you are already qualified to be a teacher, its just the subject matter thats stopping you!
     
  14. joli2

    joli2 New commenter

    Just a small thing then.
     
  15. :-/
     
  16. darkness

    darkness New commenter

    Ooh my. To be honest, I am dismayed more and more as the years go on with more and more reports of people crossing over, particularly between D&T and art, something I really dislike with a passion if I am honest.

    I too am a firm believer in holding a relevant degree. There is the contextual studies elements to teaching art, and also, art teachers although usually having some specialism often are pretty much good all rounders with other materials, something which has come about through the degree and further then through the PGCEs etc.

    Even if you did manage to get on a course, and there are many ones out there with very little cred to my utter dismay once again who would be happy to take just about anybody, I would fear you would greatly struggle at interview stage when trying for a post.

    My recommendation would be and there are shortages in some places, for you to apply for a History PGCE, and find a teaching post for this. And then undertake in the evening or part time a degree course in art. Once done, you can use the existing PGCE qualification, even though it is for History and start applying for art posts. You would certainly be able to offer a couple of subjects.
     
  17. I know someone who doesn't have an art related degree, yet they went onto to become a teacher of art and a good one at that, once you have QTS you can diversify in any direction, but I do agree that you need to show your dedication for the subject.
     
  18. darkness

    darkness New commenter

    Most institutions now ask for a relevant degree. And if you want funding for the teaching course in England at least a 2.1 too.
     



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  20. QTS is not age-range specific. If you are a qualified teacher, you are qualified to teach in any age range, regardless of your training.
    It's down to the school as to whether they hire you without secondary training which, as I said, is highly unlikely.
    So you can teach it in theory as you are legally qualified to. In practice, it would be virtually impossible.
    My primary degree isn't age-specific. It's just "primary". There is so much variety in the structure of degrees. I think most trainees specialise in one key stage but I trained for both.
     

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