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Do any supply agencies pay a "salary" for no work?

Discussion in 'Supply teaching' started by lostkitten, Jun 20, 2011.

  1. I've been told that Hays and another supply company whose name escapes me will pay a weekly salary to supply teachers, even if they are not booked that week. It didn't sound right to me and I couldn't find anything on the Hays site. Anyone heard of something like this?
     
  2. I've been told that Hays and another supply company whose name escapes me will pay a weekly salary to supply teachers, even if they are not booked that week. It didn't sound right to me and I couldn't find anything on the Hays site. Anyone heard of something like this?
     
  3. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    Yes. It's called a Guaranteed Payment scheme. There were more such schemes years ago when supply work was plentiful and supply teachers couold pick and choose where they went for a a day's work/pay. It was difficult to recruit for the really challenging schools so agencies offered to sign some teachers to Guaranteed Payment schemes so that they would be able to meet the staffing needs of those schools. The teacher was not able to refuse a booking (unless ill) as they were contracted to work every day if required.

     
  4. WOW! Seemed too good to be true. Do you know which agencies still offer them?
     
  5. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    No but it's not so great as you will rarely be at home on full pay as they will placethe teacher first in the challenging schools (they always have staff off sick!).
    I once spent a day at probably the worst school in my county and I rang my agency as soon as I got home and said that I'd never go back there, even if it meant never working again! The consultant confided that they had real problems getting anyone to do more than a day there. This was several years ago when the USA and the UK had invaded Iraq. "We'd find it easier sending supply teachers to Iraq!" he said. Just thinking about that day makes the hairs rise on the back of my neck.
    One supply teacher there was employed on the Guaranteed payment Scheme. She never had a day at home on full pay and never got to teach either as it was all behaviour management, otherwise known as Trying to Keep Them in the Classroom so that They Don't Wreck The Corridors and Set Off the Fire Alarms.
     
  6. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    Just remembered ... the HOD shook my hand for staying all day! He said many supply teachers jumped ship at morning break. "Go home, open a bottle of wine and forget you were ever here", he advised.
     
  7. Oh my gosh, that sounds even worse than where I am now. And this is definitely the worst school I've been in for behaviour management (lack of) and pressure from SLT.
     
  8. They use to years ago, but now that the dreaded CS roles are everywhere-they dont offer them. I was on a GPS with new directions. Worth a try!
     
  9. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    I went to the staffroom at morning break and asked where the incident forms were as I had made notes on so many outrageously behaved pupils. No-one knew what I was talking about! One said that she'd been a teacher there for 4 years and had never seen an incident form! Basically, almost all the pupils were 'off the wall' and there was no point in following anything up. Each classroom was basically its own exclusion room!
    I knew I was in for 'interesting times' that day when the head told us at staff briefing that in the past they'd only needed to get health officers in to advise YR 10 and 11 about Chlamydia but it was his sad duty to inform us that there was now an outbreak of the disease in yr 8 and steps were being taken to educate the younger children!
     
  10. les25paul

    les25paul Star commenter

    "once spent a day at probably the worst school in my county and I rang my agency as soon as I got home and said that I'd never go back there, even if it meant never working again! The consultant confided that they had real problems getting anyone to do more than a day there. This was several years ago when the USA and the UK had invaded Iraq. "We'd find it easier sending supply teachers to Iraq!" he said."

    As a supply teacher who's worked in some very poor schools and as a military reservist who's served in Afghanistan I can easily believe that.
    In fact I've used that reason myself to avoid some placements.
     

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