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Do all Literacy lessons need to involve writing?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by gossipgirl329, Apr 4, 2012.

  1. Hi everyone,
    I'm a PGCE student planning a literacy lesson for my Year 2s to introduce fantasy stories. I was just wondering if it is ok to have a literacy lesson that explores the concept of imagination without the children actually writing anything. I was thinking of using the book 'Millie's Marvellous Hat' and having the children design their own hats that they will wear during the term to help them travel through the different settings we explore. Do I need to get them to write a description of their hat or is one lesson without writing acceptable?
    Any words of wisdom appreciated!
    Thanks
     
  2. Hi everyone,
    I'm a PGCE student planning a literacy lesson for my Year 2s to introduce fantasy stories. I was just wondering if it is ok to have a literacy lesson that explores the concept of imagination without the children actually writing anything. I was thinking of using the book 'Millie's Marvellous Hat' and having the children design their own hats that they will wear during the term to help them travel through the different settings we explore. Do I need to get them to write a description of their hat or is one lesson without writing acceptable?
    Any words of wisdom appreciated!
    Thanks
     
  3. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    *Ssshhhhh* Don't tell anyone this...but sometimes, in my year 2, we go a whole week or more without actually writing in our literacy lessons. We cover reading or S&L objectives and sometimes lead up to writing, but not necessarily write.

    But some schools insist on writing in every single lesson...check with yours.
     
  4. modgepodge

    modgepodge Established commenter

    You definitely, definitely do not need to get the children to write in every lesson. No way. If one lesson spent talking about and making something is going to hugely increase their engagement in the rest of the unit then that's fine. I did a 3 week unit on fairy tales with year 1 and for the first 2 weeks we barely did any writing. We listened to stories and retold them, talked about them, made "wanted" posters for the queen in snow white, drew story boards, did puppet shows etc. the final piece of writing they did in the 3rd week was brilliant. Talk for writing at that age is hugely important. That said....from what mm says above perhaps some schools wouldn't approve of this so perhaps you better check. I'd plan the whole unit or the first week then give it to your mentor to check over, if they're not happy with that one lesson they can tell you then.
     
  5. My school requires "evidence of learning" in every book every day. The HT would rather that this was writing in English (sorry, Literacy), but personally, I agree that not every English lesson needs to include writing.
    We even have to evidence speaking and listening in books, and M/O evidence every day in maths lessons, so I don't think my school is necessarily typical though!


     
  6. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    But writing in a book is not 'evidence' that anything has been learned. My partner class has far more in terms of volume in their literacy books than mine and yet have all made more or less no progress this year, certainly none at all in the right direction.

    Actually I have a feeling you might know that work in books does not necessarily equal learning...
     
  7. oldsomeman

    oldsomeman Star commenter

    Once again it tis the pressures of loming ofsted which says that writing or evidence thereoff must be shown in books..........any real teacher realises that not all lessons involve writing..the stimulating of the immagination is far more important.
     
  8. During our recent Ofsted, I taught reading skills which led to a structured discussion around a text. No writing at all in this lesson however it was leading to a written outcome in the days to come. Rated as an outstanding lesson.
    For the person who has pressure to record every lesson, you have my sympathies.
     
  9. Indeed, Minnie.
    Our HT looks at volume of work before anything else. In fact, in a recent staff meeting, he mentioned that my class were clearly not doing very well in writing because we are still on our first writing book this year and he would expect to see KS2 finishing two or three exercise books per year...
    The phrase "weighing the pig" suits the ethos at my school perfectly.

     
  10. Of course you do not need to do writing in every single literacy lesson. Literacy isn't just about being able to write. It also includes reading, speaking and listening.

    I teach year 1 and we do a lot of speaking and listening during the first part of the week, which then leads to to a writing task at the end of week. This has been really beneficial as, working in an international school, most of our children do now have English as a first language. The speaking and listening activities help build up the vocabulary needed for the children to be able to do their writing at the end of the week.
     

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