1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded education professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Dissertation/primary modern languages/phonics help and advice

Discussion in 'Primary' started by CatherineL90, Sep 9, 2012.

  1. I am a trainee teacher doing a QTS course at University where I am graduating next year. Last year I specialised in primary modern languages and this year I have chosen to base my dissertation on two 'hot topics' ; French as a PML and phonics. My title and key questions focus on whether children in KS2 can use systematic synthetic phonics as a strategy to help them read French. My aim is to deliver 6 (roughly) sessions to a group of pupil's with the aim of teaching them how to use phonics as a reading strategy, very similar to what they would be used to doing throughout KS1.
    I am not a native French speaker, although I did do French A level 4 years ago. Are there any websites/resources or advice you think would be relevant? I feel a little out of my depth but I think it could be an interesting topic.

    Catherine
     
  2. I am a trainee teacher doing a QTS course at University where I am graduating next year. Last year I specialised in primary modern languages and this year I have chosen to base my dissertation on two 'hot topics' ; French as a PML and phonics. My title and key questions focus on whether children in KS2 can use systematic synthetic phonics as a strategy to help them read French. My aim is to deliver 6 (roughly) sessions to a group of pupil's with the aim of teaching them how to use phonics as a reading strategy, very similar to what they would be used to doing throughout KS1.
    I am not a native French speaker, although I did do French A level 4 years ago. Are there any websites/resources or advice you think would be relevant? I feel a little out of my depth but I think it could be an interesting topic.

    Catherine
     
  3. Hi, thank you for your feedback. I have been looking at different websites and resources and it seems that once I get my head around the various phoneme-grapheme correspondences, I should be well on my way.
    Thanks again
     
  4. Also, Jolly Phonics do a French version of their phonics programme:
    www.jollylearning.co.uk Le manuel phonique. For teaching French reading, writing and
    spelling. In the same format as The Phonics Handbook, Le manuel
    phonique introduces the main 36 letter sounds in French, with
    'actions' for each one, and activity sheets
     
  5. Lara mfl 05

    Lara mfl 05 Star commenter

    I can thoroughly recommend le manuel phonetique as a resource, especially if you're familiar with the format from the English version.
     
  6. invincible

    invincible New commenter

    Interesting idea. One main point to remember though is that when teaching reading in a second language, students really need to have some practice first in using the language and a developed vocabulary bank in order to understand what they are reading. Teaching them reading with synthetic phonics in French would just be teaching them how to decode words in French - a bit pointless when they don't have the language to back up what they "read". Kind of puts the phonics tests in year 1 into perspective, doesn't it?
     
  7. Not true.
    Learning the pronunciation of a just a few words, such as 'jai, fais, vais', means they can pronounce them correctly in all others they meet. There is no need for word by word memorisation, as with 'so, do, go, to, paid, said, man, many ....'
    It means they can pronounce new words they meet in a text without consulting a pronunciation guide, or someone telling them how to pronounce the word. As context often gives a clue to meaning, it means u don't need to consult a dictionary nearly as much when learning French as u do in English.
    It's also a good idea to emphasize the graphemes which are used in both French and English, such as 'ou', but have a regular sound in French, but not in English (sound, soup, trouble).
     
  8. I have just received this manuel in the post and it is AMAZING. the systematic approach, similar to when teaching English, is really helping me get to grips with what sounds I should be teaching first and how to do it.
    I couldn't have asked for a better resource so thank you!
     
  9. Geekie

    Geekie Occasional commenter

  10. It may be of interest that the very successful commercial langauge tuition organisation Rosetta Stone uses Perceptual Learning rather than phonics.
     

Share This Page