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Dissertation help

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by sarahlj222, Feb 17, 2011.

  1. Hi,
    I'm currently in the process of writing my final year dissertation and wondered if anybody could give me any inspiration for my research idea? I'm writing it on how to engage boys in reading so if anyone has any ideas on how to research this in schools or methods that you use that would be great!
    Thanks [​IMG]
     
  2. Hi,
    I'm currently in the process of writing my final year dissertation and wondered if anybody could give me any inspiration for my research idea? I'm writing it on how to engage boys in reading so if anyone has any ideas on how to research this in schools or methods that you use that would be great!
    Thanks [​IMG]
     
  3. Small step, very structured synthetic phonics teaching and some motivation too. There's no reason why young boys should not be engaged with their reading.
     
  4. Perhaps you can ask for some advice on the UK Reading Reform Foundation website message forum at www.rrf.org.uk . This is a site dedicated to the subject of reading.
     
  5. Hi
    Boys need motivation and reading is definately achievable if you find the right reading material. Engaging boys in activities that encourage thier reading such as treasure hunts, games and ICT. As far as methodology you need to investigate your chosen subject well, the library is a good starting place and wading your way through the journals looking for anything connected to 'reading with boys' will certainly give you some ideas. I can recommend Guy Roberts-Holmes as a great step-by-step guide for doing your research project. Also MacNaugton, Rolfe and Siraj-Blatchford, Doing Early Childhood Research is excellent. There is some very interesting articles come up recently regarding the benefits of ICT for young children, this may be worth investigating or the benefits of using a white board screen?
    Hope this is helpful.
     
  6. <font size="2">Because boys tend to have a slightly more logical approach to most things than girls, many of them find the phonic inconsistencies of some English spellings harder to cope with, as I have tried to explain at </font>http://englishspellingproblems.blogspot.com/2010/03/worse-for-boys.html

     
  7. choralsongster

    choralsongster New commenter

    Hi
    As part of my mini topic on spies and investigation this week, I set the F2 kids the challenge to 'crack the code'. I had up a simple code, eg a=1, b=2... on a laminated paper, and had numbered codes (sentences or instructions) for them to decipher.
    All my boys (bar one) actively participated each day willingly (child initiated activity) by deciphering the letters. This includes a child who is still on Stage 1 first word books. When reading with him individually, he knows most of the Phase 2 & 3 phonemes, but struggles to blend them into CVC (he can manage VC) words. In this task he was displaying the capability of blending much more (Profile evidence!!)
    They then had to read the code/sentence, and then come to read it to me, demonstrating the understanding. I believe they enjoyed this reading task so much, as there was a reward at the end (a secret spy sticker), and also because it was reading in-role, and for a purpose. They were reading CVC words, but also words containing vowel and consonant digraphs and trigraphs (Phase 3 level), applying their Letters and Sounds knowledge practically.
    I think the main point with getting boys to read willingly is to make it fun, and in a way they don't realise they're doing it!
    Hope this helps xx
     
  8. Leapyearbaby64

    Leapyearbaby64 New commenter

    Yesterday there was a group of 5 boys sitting in my reading corner, each with a Jolly Phonics book all doing their sounds together and sounding and blending CVC words. I was almost exploding with pride! I've had an interesting year so far with boys and reading. I had one come into my class with a reading age of over 8 years. I got into the habit of getting him to read out the title of the book at storytime, no particular thought behind it, but just so that I was acknowledging what he could do. This seemed to create lots of interest and all the children were really keen to be able to do this too. 7 of my top 8 readers are boys.
     

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